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Child Labor: Theory, Evidence, and Policy

  • Drusilla K. Brown

    (Tufts University)

  • Alan V. Deardorff

    (University of Michigan)

  • Robert M Stern

    (University of Michigan)

There is a growing theoretical and empirical literature concerning the causes and consequences of child labor. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the policy initiatives targeted on child labor in light of the newly emerging theoretical argumentation and empirical evidence. We focus in particular on programs to address child-labor practices, and we attempt to evaluate these programs, given the empirical evidence concerning the primary determinants of when and why children work. Throughout, we find it instructive to evaluate the policies that have been adopted with the intent of reducing overall child labor in terms of the impact they are likely have on the welfare of children.

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File URL: http://www.fordschool.umich.edu/rsie/workingpapers/Papers451-475/r474.pdf
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Paper provided by Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan in its series Working Papers with number 474.

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Length: 74 Pages
Date of creation: 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mie:wpaper:474
Contact details of provider: Postal: ANN ARBOR MICHIGAN 48109
Web page: http://fordschool.umich.edu/rsie/

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