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Child Labor and School Attendance: Two Joint Decisions

Author

Listed:
  • Nielsen, H.S.

Abstract

In this paper, a variety of potentially explanatory indicators for child labor and school attendance in Zambia is scrutinized. By analysing the results from a bivariate probit model, new doubt is raised with regard to the income sensitivity of the child labor choice. Different factors in the model influence the child labor and schooling choice. Based on the results, sensitization, narrowly targeted subsidies or stipends are suggested to at-risk households in selected provinces, provided that children are sent to school.

Suggested Citation

  • Nielsen, H.S., 1998. "Child Labor and School Attendance: Two Joint Decisions," Papers 98-15, Centre for Labour Market and Social Research, Danmark-.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:clmsre:98-15
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Anu Rammohan, 2000. "The Interaction of Child-labour and Schooling in Developing Countries: A Theoretical Perspective," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 25(2), pages 85-99, December.
    2. Yacouba Diallo, 2001. "Les déterminants du travail des enfants en Côte d'Ivoire," Documents de travail 55, Groupe d'Economie du Développement de l'Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV.
    3. Blunch,Niels-Hugo & Verner,Dorte, 2000. "Revisiting the link between poverty and child labor - the Ghanaian experience," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2488, The World Bank.
    4. HAN Phoumin & FUKUI Seiichi & MIWA Kana, 2008. "Testing the "Wealth Paradox" on the Incidence of Child Labor: A Case Study in Cambodia," GSICS Working Paper Series 18, Graduate School of International Cooperation Studies, Kobe University.
    5. Jean-Pierre Lachaud, 2008. "Le travail des enfants et la pauvreté en Afrique : un réexamen appliqué au Burkina Faso," Economie & Prévision, La Documentation Française, vol. 0(5), pages 47-65.
    6. Lourdes Diaz Olvera & Didier Plat & Pascal Pochet, 2010. "À l'écart de l'école ? Pauvreté, accessibilité et scolarisation à Conakry," Post-Print halshs-00566203, HAL.
    7. repec:rdg:wpaper:em-dp2004-21 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Niels-Hugo BLUNCH & Amit DAR & Lorenzo GUARCELLO & Scott LYON & Amy RITUALO & Furio C. ROSATI, 2005. "Child work in Zambia: A comparative study of survey instruments," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 144(2), pages 211-235, June.
    9. Daniele Checchi, 2000. "Does educational achievement help to explain income inequality?," Departmental Working Papers 2000-11, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
    10. Sonia Bhalotra, 2007. "Is Child Work Necessary?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 69(1), pages 29-55, February.
    11. Bernhard Ganglmair, 2005. "Intrinsic Competition and the Labor-Schooling Trade-off in Uganda Competition in Child Labor and Schooling Decision Making in Uganda. Evidence from a Bivariate Probit Model," Labor and Demography 0504002, EconWPA, revised 21 Sep 2005.
    12. Pushkar Maitra & Ranjan Ray, 2002. "The Joint Estimation of Child Participation in Schooling and Employment: Comparative Evidence from Three Continents," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(1), pages 41-62.
    13. Jackline Wahba, 2001. "Child Labor and Poverty Transmission: No Room For Dreams," Working Papers 0108, Economic Research Forum, revised 03 2001.
    14. Vimefall, Elin, 2011. "What determines which children work? Empirical evidence from Kenya," Working Papers 2011:3, Örebro University, School of Business.
    15. F. Blanco & M. G. Breglia & L. Guarcello & C. Valdivia, 2008. "Violence against children:preliminary evidence from Colombia, El Salvador, Cambodia and Ecuador," UCW Working Paper 41, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).
    16. Sen, Gitanjali, 2002. "Considering the effects of poverty and schooling returns on child labour in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 17393, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Chiwaula, Levison/S, 2009. "Child labour and poverty linkages: A micro analysis from rural Malawian data," MPRA Paper 25915, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Oct 2009.
    18. Shunsuke Sakamoto, 2006. "Parental Attitudes toward Children and Child Labor: Evidence from Rural India," Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series d05-136, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    19. Maoyong Fan & Mimi Houston & Anita Alves Pena, 2014. "Determinants of child labor in the modern United States: Evidence from agricultural workers and their children and concerns for ongoing public policy," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(1), pages 287-306.
    20. Wahba, J., 2006. "The influence of market wages and parental history on child labour and schooling in Egypt," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 603, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
    21. Vimefall, Elin, 2015. "Income diversification and working children," Working Papers 2015:8, Örebro University, School of Business.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    HUMAN CAPITAL ; YOUTH ; EDUCATION ; AFRICA;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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