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International Migration, Remittances, and the Human Capital Formation of Egyptian Children

Author

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  • Koska, Onur A.
  • Saygin, Perihan O.
  • Cagatay, Selim
  • Artal-Tur, Andres

Abstract

We study the roles that migration and remittances play in the human capital formation of children in Egypt. Our estimations reveal a significant association between remittances and human capital formation: the higher the probability of receipt of remittances, the higher the probability of school enrollment, and the older the age at which children enter the labor force. Although, with regard to the likelihood of school enrollment and the age of the first participation in the labor force, the family disruption effect of migration dominates the income effect of remittances, the likelihood of labor force participation decreases even in households from which both parents migrated.

Suggested Citation

  • Koska, Onur A. & Saygin, Perihan O. & Cagatay, Selim & Artal-Tur, Andres, 2013. "International Migration, Remittances, and the Human Capital Formation of Egyptian Children," MPRA Paper 68193, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:68193
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mohammad Reza Farzanegan & Sherif Maher Hassan, 2016. "How does the Flow of Remittances Affect the Trade Balance of the Middle East and North Africa?," CESifo Working Paper Series 6172, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. repec:rfh:bbejor:v:6:y:2017:i:2:p:74-91 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Anwar, Sajid & Cooray, Arusha, 2015. "Financial flows and per capita income in developing countries," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 304-314.
    4. repec:spr:izamig:v:8:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1186_s40176-017-0118-y is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:eee:injoed:v:55:y:2017:i:c:p:11-16 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Gloria Clarissa O. Dzeha, 2016. "The decipher, theory or empirics: a review of remittance studies," African Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Finance, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 5(2), pages 113-134.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration; Remittances; Human capital formation; Child labor; Egypt;

    JEL classification:

    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor

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