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Migration, remittances and educational outcomes: The case of Haiti

  • Bredl, Sebastian
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    Using the Cox proportional hazards model this paper empirically investigates how migration of household members and the receipt of remittances affect educational outcomes in Haiti. Based on a theoretical approach it tries to disentangle the effects of both phenomena that have mostly been jointly modeled in previous literature. The results suggest that remittances play an important role for poor households in alleviating budget constraints, whereas no effect of the migrated household head's absence is detected. The latter might be so due to the high imprecision surrounding the estimated hazard ratios. Household wealth, captured via an asset index, is found to have a signi?cant impact on education as well, supporting the idea that budget constraints play a crucial role in schooling decisions in Haiti due to the dominance of private schools and the high poverty rate in the country.

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    File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/39812/1/614330394.pdf
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    Paper provided by Justus Liebig University Giessen, Center for international Development and Environmental Research (ZEU) in its series Discussion Papers with number 44.

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    Date of creation: 2009
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    Handle: RePEc:zbw:zeudps:44
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.uni-giessen.de/cms/faculties/research-centers/zeu-en/view

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    1. Calero, Carla & Bedi, Arjun S. & Sparrow, Robert, 2008. "Remittances, Liquidity Constraints and Human Capital Investments in Ecuador," IZA Discussion Papers 3358, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Verner, Dorte, 2008. "Making poor Haitians count--poverty in rural and urban Haiti based on the first household survey for Haiti," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4571, The World Bank.
    3. Pablo Acosta & Cesar Calderón & Pablo Fajnzylber & Humberto López, 2006. "Remittances and Development in Latin America," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(7), pages 957-987, 07.
    4. Edwards, Alejandra Cox & Ureta, Manuelita, 2003. "International migration, remittances, and schooling: evidence from El Salvador," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 429-461, December.
    5. José Ernesto López-Córdova, 2006. "Globalization, migration and development : the role of Mexican migrant remittances," INTAL Working Papers 1440, Inter-American Development Bank, INTAL.
    6. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Georges, Annie & Pozo, Susan, 2008. "Migration, Remittances and Children’s Schooling in Haiti," IZA Discussion Papers 3657, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Justesen, Michael & Verner, Dorte, 2007. "Factors impacting youth development in Haiti," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4110, The World Bank.
    8. Taylor, J. Edward & Mora, Jorge & Adams, Richard H., Jr., 2005. "Remittances, Inequality and Poverty: Evidence from Rural Mexico," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19245, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    9. Acosta, Pablo & Calderon, Cesar & Fajnzylber, Pablo & Lopez, Humberto, 2008. "What is the Impact of International Remittances on Poverty and Inequality in Latin America?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 89-114, January.
    10. David McKenzie & Hillel Rapoport, 2011. "Can migration reduce educational attainment? Evidence from Mexico," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 24(4), pages 1331-1358, October.
    11. Acosta, Pablo, 2006. "Labor supply, school attendance, and remittances from international migration : the case of El Salvador," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3903, The World Bank.
    12. Bernt Bratsberg, 2002. "School Quality and Returns to Education of U.S. Immigrants," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 40(2), pages 177-198, April.
    13. David McKenzie, 2005. "Measuring inequality with asset indicators," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 18(2), pages 229-260, 06.
    14. Herrmann, Roland & Kramb, Marc & Mönnich, Christina, 2000. "Tariff rate quotas and the economic impacts of agricultural trade liberalization in the WTO," Discussion Papers 1, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Center for international Development and Environmental Research (ZEU).
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