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Migration, remittances and educational outcomes: The case of Haiti

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  • Bredl, Sebastian

Abstract

Using the Cox proportional hazards model this paper empirically investigates how migration of household members and the receipt of remittances affect educational outcomes in Haiti. Based on a theoretical approach it tries to disentangle the effects of both phenomena that have mostly been jointly modeled in previous literature. The results suggest that remittances play an important role for poor households in alleviating budget constraints, whereas no effect of the migrated household head's absence is detected. The latter might be so due to the high imprecision surrounding the estimated hazard ratios. Household wealth, captured via an asset index, is found to have a signi?cant impact on education as well, supporting the idea that budget constraints play a crucial role in schooling decisions in Haiti due to the dominance of private schools and the high poverty rate in the country.

Suggested Citation

  • Bredl, Sebastian, 2009. "Migration, remittances and educational outcomes: The case of Haiti," Discussion Papers 44, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Center for international Development and Environmental Research (ZEU).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zeudps:44
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Georges, Annie & Pozo, Susan, 2008. "Migration, Remittances and Children’s Schooling in Haiti," IZA Discussion Papers 3657, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Taylor, J. Edward & Mora, Jorge & Adams, Richard H., Jr. & Lopez-Feldman, Alejandro, 2005. "Remittances, Inequality and Poverty: Evidence from Rural Mexico," Working Papers 60287, University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    3. Calero, Carla & Bedi, Arjun S. & Sparrow, Robert, 2009. "Remittances, Liquidity Constraints and Human Capital Investments in Ecuador," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 1143-1154, June.
    4. Verner, Dorte, 2008. "Making poor Haitians count--poverty in rural and urban Haiti based on the first household survey for Haiti," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4571, The World Bank.
    5. George Psacharopoulos & Harry Anthony Patrinos, 2004. "Returns to investment in education: a further update," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(2), pages 111-134.
    6. Pablo Acosta & Cesar Calderón & Pablo Fajnzylber & Humberto López, 2006. "Remittances and Development in Latin America," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(7), pages 957-987, July.
    7. Ernesto López-Córdova, 2005. "Globalization, Migration, and Development: The Role of Mexican Migrant Remittances," ECONOMIA JOURNAL, THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION - LACEA, vol. 0(Fall 2005), pages 217-248, August.
    8. Bernt Bratsberg, 2002. "School Quality and Returns to Education of U.S. Immigrants," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 40(2), pages 177-198, April.
    9. Acosta, Pablo, 2006. "Labor supply, school attendance, and remittances from international migration : the case of El Salvador," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3903, The World Bank.
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    12. Herrmann, Roland & Kramb, Marc & Mönnich, Christina, 2000. "Tariff rate quotas and the economic impacts of agricultural trade liberalization in the WTO," Discussion Papers 1, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Center for international Development and Environmental Research (ZEU).
    13. David McKenzie & Hillel Rapoport, 2011. "Can migration reduce educational attainment? Evidence from Mexico," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(4), pages 1331-1358, October.
    14. David McKenzie, 2005. "Measuring inequality with asset indicators," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(2), pages 229-260, June.
    15. Acosta, Pablo & Calderon, Cesar & Fajnzylber, Pablo & Lopez, Humberto, 2008. "What is the Impact of International Remittances on Poverty and Inequality in Latin America?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 89-114, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gönsch, Iris, 2010. "Determinants of primary school enrollment in Haiti and the Dominican Republic," Discussion Papers 54, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Center for international Development and Environmental Research (ZEU).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Haiti; education; remittances; migration;

    JEL classification:

    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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