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Temporary migration in theories of international mobility of labour

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  • Katarzyna Budnik

    () (National Bank of Poland; Economic Institute)

Abstract

There is an arising consensus on the empirical importance of temporary labour migration. In acknowledgement of this fact the present overview summarizes literature that deals with drivers and effects of temporary labour movements. The overview sets together relevant elements of migration initiation and perpetuation, return migration and international trade theories. It also complies conclusions from a growing body of empirical literature on re-emigration to the country of origin, remittances and on the behaviour of temporary versus permanent immigrants. Distinguishing temporary from permanent labour migration should help to explain the dynamics of the actual international labour movements and to understand their impact on economies.

Suggested Citation

  • Katarzyna Budnik, 2011. "Temporary migration in theories of international mobility of labour," Bank i Kredyt, Narodowy Bank Polski, vol. 42(6), pages 7-48.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbp:nbpbik:v:42:y:2011:i:6:p:7-48
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. de Arce Rafael & Mahia Ramon, 2012. "Have Migrants Bought a "Round Trip Ticket"? Determinants in Probability of Immigrants' Return in Spain," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 12(2), pages 1-22, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    temporary labour migration; return migration; international labour mobility; labour migration theory; remittances;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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