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Bringing home the money: what determines worker's remittances to transition countries?

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  • Schrooten, Mechthild

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Schrooten, Mechthild, 2005. "Bringing home the money: what determines worker's remittances to transition countries?," Discussion Paper Series a466, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  • Handle: RePEc:hit:hituec:a466
    Note: September 2005
    as

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    File URL: http://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/rs/bitstream/10086/13422/1/DP466.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Miguel León-Ledesma & Matloob Piracha, 2001. "International Migration and the Role of Remittances in Eastern Europe," Studies in Economics 0113, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    2. El-Sakka, M. I. T. & McNabb, Robert, 1999. "The Macroeconomic Determinants of Emigrant Remittances," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(8), pages 1493-1502, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Deodat E. Adenutsi & Meshach J. Aziakpono & Matthew K. Ocran, 2011. "The Changing Impact Of Macroeconomic Environment On Remittance Inflows In Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Academic Research in Economics, Spiru Haret University, Faculty of Accounting and Financial Management Constanta, vol. 3(2 (July)), pages 136-167.
    2. Marilena Giannetti & Daniele Federici & Michele Raitano, 2009. "Does Migration Help Reducing Inequality and Social Exclusion?," Working Papers 118, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics.
    3. Katarzyna Budnik, 2011. "Temporary migration in theories of international mobility of labour," Bank i Kredyt, Narodowy Bank Polski, vol. 42(6), pages 7-48.
    4. Maelan Le Goff & Kangni R Kpodar, 2011. "Do Remittances Reduce Aid Dependency?," IMF Working Papers 11/246, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Deodat E. Adenutsi, 2014. "macroeconomic determinants of workers’ remittances and compensation of employees in sub-saharan Africa," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 48(1), pages 337-360, January-M.
    6. Vladimir Gligorov & Anna Iara & Michael Landesmann & Robert Stehrer & Hermine Vidovic, 2008. "Western Balkan Countries: Adjustment Capacity to External Shocks, with a Focus on Labour Markets," wiiw Research Reports 352, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    7. Naiditch, Claire & Vranceanu, Radu, 2010. "Equilibrium migration with invested remittances: The EECA evidence," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 454-474, December.
    8. Kakhkharov, Jakhongir & Akimov, Alexandr & Rohde, Nicholas, 2017. "Transaction costs and recorded remittances in the post-Soviet economies: Evidence from a new dataset on bilateral flows," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 98-107.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    remittances; migration; dynamic panel data models;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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