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Why do people migrate? A review of the theoretical literature

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  • Hagen-Zanker, Jessica

Abstract

Massey et al. (1994) is a ground-breaking paper in the migration literature that discusses and unifies different migration theories. However, their review and synthesis is incomplete and fairly brief for researchers interested in a deeper understanding of the migration theory literature. This paper therefore aims to review the complete spectrum of economic migration theory from the 1950s until today and to show the differences and complementarities between the different approaches.

Suggested Citation

  • Hagen-Zanker, Jessica, 2008. "Why do people migrate? A review of the theoretical literature," MPRA Paper 28197, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:28197
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/28197/1/MPRA_paper_28197.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stark, Oded & Lucas, Robert E B, 1988. "Migration, Remittances, and the Family," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36(3), pages 465-481, April.
    2. Stark, Oded & Wang, You Qiang, 2002. "Migration dynamics," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 159-164, July.
    3. Stark, Oded & Bloom, David E, 1985. "The New Economics of Labor Migration," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 173-178, May.
    4. Mincer, Jacob, 1978. "Family Migration Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 749-773, October.
    5. Morrison, Andrew R, 1994. "Capital Market Imperfections, Labor Market Disequilibrium and Migration: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(2), pages 290-302, April.
    6. Sandell, Steven H, 1977. "Women and the Economics of Family Migration," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 59(4), pages 406-414, November.
    7. Stark, Oded & Levhari, David, 1982. "On Migration and Risk in LDCs," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(1), pages 191-196, October.
    8. Taylor, J. Edward & Martin, Philip L., 2001. "Human capital: Migration and rural population change," Handbook of Agricultural Economics,in: B. L. Gardner & G. C. Rausser (ed.), Handbook of Agricultural Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 9, pages 457-511 Elsevier.
    9. Bigsten, Arne, 1988. "A note on the modelling of circular smallholder migration," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 87-91.
    10. Stark, Oded, 1984. "Migration decision making : De Jong, Gordon F. and Robert W. Gardner, eds., (Pergamon, New York, 1981)," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 251-259.
    11. Harris, John R & Todaro, Michael P, 1970. "Migration, Unemployment & Development: A Two-Sector Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(1), pages 126-142, March.
    12. Lall, Somik V. & Selod, Harris & Shalizi, Zmarak, 2006. "Rural-urban migration in developing countries : a survey of theoretical predictions and empirical findings," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3915, The World Bank.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Cesar Pakissi, 2015. "Impact of utilities distribution in the population scattering: one analyzes of the African reality -Huambo Angola," ERSA conference papers ersa15p569, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Andrés Mauricio Gómez & Zoraida Ramirez Gutierrez, 2014. "Dinámica económica de las remesas enviadas desde España y Estados Unidos a Colombia entre 2005-2013: un análisis de cointegración," REVISTA APUNTES DEL CENES, UNIVERSIDAD PEDAGOGICA Y TECNOLOGICA DE COLOMBIA, December.
    3. Amare, Mulubrhan & Hohfeld, Lena & Waibel, Hermann, 2011. "Finding Quality Employment through Rural Urban Migration: a case study from Thailand," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 4, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    4. Hu, Chaoran & Chen, Kevin Z. & Reardon, Thomas, 2015. "Is There a City Size Bias? Destination Choice of Rural off-Farm Workers, Evidences from Three Areas in Rural China," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205535, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    5. Falco, Chiara & Rotondi, Valentina, 2016. "The Less Extreme, the More You Leave: Radical Islam and Willingness to Migrate," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 122-133.
    6. Mahé, Clothilde & Naudé, Wim, 2016. "Migration, occupation and education: Evidence from Ghana," MERIT Working Papers 018, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    7. Cansu Unver, 2015. "Does Broadband Facilitate Immigration Flows?," Discussion Papers 15-01, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
    8. Eisele, Katharina, 2014. "The US Labour Immigration Scheme – All about being attractive? EU Perceptions and Stakeholders’ Perspectives Reviewed," CEPS Papers 9642, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    9. Mekonnen Beyene, Berhe, 2011. "Determinants of Internal and International Migration in Ethiopia," Memorandum 24/2011, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    10. Timo Mitze & Torben Schmidt, 2015. "Internal migration, regional labor markets and the role of agglomeration economies," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 55(1), pages 61-101, October.
    11. Imran SARIHASAN, 2016. "Immigration Growth Tendencies In Oecd Countries," SEA - Practical Application of Science, Fundația Română pentru Inteligența Afacerii, Editorial Department, issue 12, pages 547-553, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    migration; migration theory;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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