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Migration Dynamics

Author

Listed:
  • Stark, Oded

    (Department of Economics, University of Oslo and University of Vienna)

  • Wang, You Qiang

    (Department of Economics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Abstract

Quite often established migrants offer assistance and support that facilitate the arrival of new migrants. Why would migrants want other migrants to join them - so much so as to be willing to pay for them to come? We suggest a rationale. Our modeling framework is capable of explaining several stylized facts pertaining to transfers by migrants and the structure and dynamics of migration.

Suggested Citation

  • Stark, Oded & Wang, You Qiang, 2002. "Migration Dynamics," Economics Series 112, Institute for Advanced Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ihs:ihsesp:112
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    File URL: http://www.ihs.ac.at/publications/eco/es-112.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2002
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Meng,Xin, 2009. "Labour Market Reform in China," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521121118.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Elke Holst & Mechthild Schrooten, 2006. "Sending Money Abroad – What Determines Migrants’ Remittances?," Discussion Papers 009, Europa-Universität Flensburg, International Institute of Management.
    2. Stark, Oded & Jakubek, Marcin, 2013. "Migration networks as a response to financial constraints: Onset, and endogenous dynamics," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 1-7.
    3. Jamal BOUOIYOUR & Amal MIFTAH, 2014. "Why do migrants remit? An insightful analysis for Moroccan case," Working Papers 2013-2014_13, CATT - UPPA - Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour, revised Apr 2014.
    4. Jamal Bouoiyour & Amal Miftah, 2015. "Why do migrants remit? Testing hypotheses for the case of Morocco," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-20, December.
    5. Radu Vranceanu & Claire Naiditch, 2009. "Migratory equilibria with invested remittances," Post-Print hal-00553550, HAL.
    6. Holst, Elke & Schrooten, Mechthild, 2006. "Migration and Money: What determines Remittances? Evidence from Germany," Discussion Paper Series a477, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    7. Falco, Chiara & Rotondi, Valentina, 2016. "The Less Extreme, the More You Leave: Radical Islam and Willingness to Migrate," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 122-133.
    8. Naiditch, Claire & Vranceanu, Radu, 2010. "Equilibrium migration with invested remittances: The EECA evidence," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 454-474, December.
    9. Guzman, Mark G. & Haslag, Joseph H. & Orrenius, Pia M., 2003. "A role for government policy and sunspots in explaining endogenous fluctuations in illegal immigration," Working Papers 0305, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    10. Stéphane Mahuteau & P.N. (Raja) Junankar, 2008. "Do Migrants get Good Jobs in Australia? The Role of Ethnic Networks in Job Search," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(s1), pages 115-130, September.
    11. Mahuteau, Stephane & Junankar, Pramod, 2007. "Do Migrants succeed in the Australian Labour Market? Furher Evidence on Job Quality," MPRA Paper 8703, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Mar 2008.
    12. Neubecker, Nina & Smolka, Marcel, 2012. "Co-national and transnational networks in international migration to Spain," University of Tuebingen Working Papers in Economics and Finance 46, University of Tuebingen, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences.
    13. Hagen-Zanker, Jessica, 2008. "Why do people migrate? A review of the theoretical literature," MPRA Paper 28197, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Hagen-Zanker, Jessica, 2010. "Modest expectations: Causes and effects of migration on migrant households in source countries," MPRA Paper 29507, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Piracha, Matloob & Saraogi, Amrita, 2013. "Remittances and Migration Intentions of the Left-Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 7779, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    16. Joe Haslag & Mark G. Guzman & Pia M. Orrenius, 2003. "A Role for Sunspots in Explaining Endogenous Fluctutations in Illegal Immigration," Working Papers 0312, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration dynamics; Migrants' transfers; Follow-up migration;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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