IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/izamig/v4y2015i1p1-2010.1186-s40176-014-0027-2.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Why do migrants remit? Testing hypotheses for the case of Morocco

Author

Listed:
  • Jamal Bouoiyour

    ()

  • Amal Miftah

    ()

Abstract

F22, J61, D1, D91, O55. Copyright Bouoiyour and Miftah; licensee Springer. 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Jamal Bouoiyour & Amal Miftah, 2015. "Why do migrants remit? Testing hypotheses for the case of Morocco," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-20, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:izamig:v:4:y:2015:i:1:p:1-20:10.1186/s40176-014-0027-2
    DOI: 10.1186/s40176-014-0027-2
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1186/s40176-014-0027-2
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Stark, Oded & Wang, You Qiang, 2002. "Migration dynamics," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 159-164, July.
    2. Calero, Carla & Bedi, Arjun S. & Sparrow, Robert, 2009. "Remittances, Liquidity Constraints and Human Capital Investments in Ecuador," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 1143-1154, June.
    3. Rapoport, Hillel & Docquier, Frederic, 2006. "The Economics of Migrants' Remittances," Handbook on the Economics of Giving, Reciprocity and Altruism, Elsevier.
    4. Poirine, Bernard, 1997. "A theory of remittances as an implicit family loan arrangement," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 589-611, January.
    5. Bouoiyour, Jamal & Miftah, Amal & Selmi, Refk, 2014. "Do Financial Flows raise or reduce Economic growth Volatility? Some Lessons from Moroccan case," MPRA Paper 57258, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. RANA Rezwanul Hasan & HASHMI Rubayyat, 2015. "The Determinants Of Worker Remittance In Terms Of Foreign Factors: The Case Of Bangladesh," Studies in Business and Economics, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 10(3), pages 81-93, December.
    2. repec:eco:journ1:2017-02-27 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Mukhopadhyay, Sankar & Zou, Miaomiao, 2018. "Will Skill-Based Immigration Policies Lead to Lower Remittances? An Analysis of the Relations between Education, Sponsorship, and Remittances," IZA Discussion Papers 11330, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Giulia Bettin & Riccardo Lucchetti & Claudia Pigini, 2016. "State dependence and unobserved heterogeneity in a double hurdle model for remittances: evidence from immigrants to Germany," Mo.Fi.R. Working Papers 127, Money and Finance Research group (Mo.Fi.R.) - Univ. Politecnica Marche - Dept. Economic and Social Sciences.
    5. Giulia Bettin & Riccardo Lucchetti, 2016. "Steady streams and sudden bursts: persistence patterns in remittance decisions," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(1), pages 263-292, January.
    6. repec:eee:matsoc:v:87:y:2017:i:c:p:64-71 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Jamal Bouoiyour, Amal Miftah, 2015. "Migration, remittances and educational levels of household members left behind: Evidence from rural Morocco," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 12(1), pages 21-40, July.
    8. Maelan Le Goff, 2016. "Feminization of migration and trends in remittances," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 220-220, January.
    9. Bredtmann, Julia & Martínez Flores, Fernanda & Otten, Sebastian, 2016. "Remittances and the brain drain: Evidence from microdata for Sub-Saharan Africa," Ruhr Economic Papers 654, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    10. Mduduzi Biyase & Fiona Tregenna, 2016. "Determinants of remittances in South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 176, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    11. Thomas Farole & Yoonyoung Cho, 2017. "Bangladesh Jobs Diagnostic," World Bank Other Operational Studies 28498, The World Bank.
    12. Jamal Bouoiyour & Amal Miftah & Christophe Muller, 2017. "Maghreb Rural-Urban Migration: The Movement to Morocco’s Towns," Working Papers 1082, Economic Research Forum, revised 04 Oct 2017.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:izamig:v:4:y:2015:i:1:p:1-20:10.1186/s40176-014-0027-2. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.