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¿Por qué los migrantes envían remesas?: Repaso de las principales motivaciones microeconómicas

Listed author(s):
  • Diego Alberto Sandoval Herrera

    ()

  • María Fernanda Reyes Roa

    ()

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    El aumento de los flujos migratorios y la importancia de los flujos de remesas hacia países emergentes han motivado desde los años 70´s el estudio de los determinantes de las remesas. El primer paso para acercarse a este problema es entender las motivaciones microeconómicas de los agentes que deciden enviar dinero a sus familias en el país de origen. Este documento hace un repaso de literatura que se han desarrollado para describir los incentivos de los migrantes a enviar remesas. Se hace un análisis microeconómico desde 3 enfoques: el de decisión individual, el de arreglos familiares y el de motivos mixtos.

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    File URL: http://www.banrep.gov.co/docum/ftp/be_738.pdf
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    Paper provided by BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA in its series BORRADORES DE ECONOMIA with number 010036.

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    Length: 31
    Date of creation: 09 Oct 2012
    Handle: RePEc:col:000094:010036
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