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Migrants' intentions to return home and capital transfers: A study of Tongans and Samoans in Australia

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  • Dennis Ahlburg
  • Richard Brown

Abstract

This article examines the attributes of migrants from the Pacific island states of Tonga and Samoa living in Australia to assess the extent to which return migrants could contribute to the human and physical capital stock of the migrant-sending countries. It also examines the impact of intention to return on remittances and asset accumulation. The study finds that very few migrants plan to return home and very little evidence that those who plan to return embody significant human capital (education, experience and skills). Intention to return may be important, nevertheless, since those who plan to return remit significantly more than those that do not and also accumulate far more physical capital at home than those that do not intend to return.

Suggested Citation

  • Dennis Ahlburg & Richard Brown, 1998. "Migrants' intentions to return home and capital transfers: A study of Tongans and Samoans in Australia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(2), pages 125-151.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:35:y:1998:i:2:p:125-151
    DOI: 10.1080/00220389808422567
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Diego Alberto Sandoval Herrera & María Fernanda Reyes Roa, 2012. "¿Por qué los migrantes envían remesas?: Repaso de las principales motivaciones microeconómicas," BORRADORES DE ECONOMIA 010036, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA.
    2. Brian Roberts & Malgorzata Markiewitz & Marjan Nikolov & Aleksandar Stojkov, 2008. "A Study On Determinants And Trends In Remittance Flows In Macedonia," Journal Articles, Center For Economic Analyses, pages 41-61, June.
    3. Social Policy and Population Section, Social Development Division, ESCAP., 2011. "Asia-Pacific Population Journal Volume 26, No. 4," Asia-Pacific Population Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 26(4), pages 1-84, December.
    4. DeVoretz, Don J. & Vadean, Florin, 2006. "Social Relations and Remittances: Evidence from Canadian Micro Data," IZA Discussion Papers 2501, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Manon Domingues Dos Santos & François-Charles Wolff, 2010. "Pourquoi les immigrés portugais veulent-ils tant retourner au pays ?," Economie & Prévision, La Documentation Française, vol. 0(4), pages 1-14.
    6. Tineke Fokkema & Eralba Cela & Elena Ambrosetti, 2013. "Giving from the Heart or from the Ego? Motives behind Remittances of the Second Generation in Europe," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(3), pages 539-572, September.
    7. Mukhopadhyay, Sankar & Zou, Miaomiao, 2018. "Will Skill-Based Immigration Policies Lead to Lower Remittances? An Analysis of the Relations between Education, Sponsorship, and Remittances," IZA Discussion Papers 11330, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Yoko Niimi & Thai Hung Pham & Barry Reilly, 2009. "Determinants of Remittances: Recent Evidence Using Data on Internal Migrants in Vietnam," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 23(1), pages 19-39, March.
    9. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Mazzolari, Francesca, 2010. "Remittances to Latin America from migrants in the United States: Assessing the impact of amnesty programs," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 323-335, March.
    10. Kasey Q. Maggard, 2004. "The role of social capital in the remittance decisions of Mexican migrants from 1969 to 2000," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2004-29, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    11. Odedokun, Matthew, 2003. "A Holistic Perception of Foreign Financing of Developing Countries' Private Sectors: Analysis and Description of Structure and Trends," WIDER Working Paper Series 001, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    12. Amin, Mohammad & Mattoo, Aaditya, 2007. "Migration from Zambia : ensuring temporariness through cooperation," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4145, The World Bank.
    13. Aaditya Mattoo & Lucy Payton, 2007. "Services Trade and Development : The Experience of Zambia," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6697.
    14. Lee, Sang-Hyop & Sukrakarn, Nopparat & Choi, Jin-Young, 2011. "Repeat migration and remittances: Evidence from Thai migrant workers," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 142-151, April.
    15. DeVoretz, Don J. & Vadean, Florin, 2005. "A Model of Foreign-Born Transfers: Evidence from Canadian Micro Data," IZA Discussion Papers 1714, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    16. Richard P.C. Brown & Gareth Leeves & Nichola Kitson & Prabha Prayaga, 2015. "Give and Take or Give and Give: Charitable Giving in Migrant Households," Discussion Papers Series 547, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    17. Filiz Garip, 2012. "An Integrated Analysis of Migration and Remittances: Modeling Migration as a Mechanism for Selection," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 31(5), pages 637-663, October.
    18. Richard Brown & Jørgen Carling & Sonja Fransen & Melissa Siegel, 2014. "Measuring remittances through surveys," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(41), pages 1243-1274, November.
    19. Hirvonen, Kalle & Lilleør, Helene Bie, 2015. "Going Back Home: Internal Return Migration in Rural Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 186-202.

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