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Why do migrants remit?


  • de la Briere, Benedicte
  • de Janvry, Alain
  • Lambert, Sylvie
  • Sadoulet, Elisabeth


Two contrasting hypotheses about what motivates Dominican migrants to send remittances to their rural parents in the Sierra are tested: (1) an investment in potential bequests and (2) an insurance contract between parents and migrant children. Remittances from young migrants, males, and migrants who want to return to the Sierra follow a pattern consistent with investment. In contrast, female migrants with no intention of returning to the Sierra play the role of insurers. The gender composition of the migrant siblings affects this remittance task-sharing, since women with no remitting brothers show interest in inheritance, while men with no sisters offer insurance.

Suggested Citation

  • de la Briere, Benedicte & de Janvry, Alain & Lambert, Sylvie & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 1997. "Why do migrants remit?," FCND discussion papers 37, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:fcnddp:37

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    10. Hoddinott, John, 1992. "Modelling Remittance Flows in Kenya," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 1(2), pages 206-232, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Katarzyna Budnik, 2011. "Temporary migration in theories of international mobility of labour," Bank i Kredyt, Narodowy Bank Polski, vol. 42(6), pages 7-48.
    2. Jamal BOUOIYOUR & Amal MIFTAH, 2012. "Le retour des migrants marocains dans leur pays d'origine, quand ? Dans quelles circonstances ?," Working Papers 2012-2013_1, CATT - UPPA - Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour, revised Aug 2012.
    3. Morduch, Jonathan & Sharma, Manohar, 2001. "Strengthening public safety nets," FCND discussion papers 122, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Mariapia Mendola, 2004. "Migration and Technological Change in Rural Households: Complements or Substitutes?," Development Working Papers 195, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano.
    5. Mendola, Mariapia, 2008. "Migration and technological change in rural households: Complements or substitutes?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(1-2), pages 150-175, February.
    6. repec:pit:wpaper:269 is not listed on IDEAS


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