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Migration, remittances and educational levels of household members left behind: Evidence from rural Morocco

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  • Jamal BOUOIYOUR
  • Amal MIFTAH

Abstract

In this paper, we empirically investigate the relationship between international migration and education attainment levels. We ask whether rural children who live in households that experience migration or/and receiving remittances are more likely to complete school at a given age than children who live in non-migrant households. Higher secondary and higher education levels are examined separately. Our results clearly show that children in remittance-receiving households complete significantly more years of schooling. In particular, remittances increase the probability of a male child completing high school. However, the evidence suggests that the international migration lowers deeply the chances of children completing higher education. Evidence also indicates the utmost importance of households’ socio-economic status in determining to what extent the household mitigates the possible detrimental effects of migration on their children’s educational outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Jamal BOUOIYOUR & Amal MIFTAH, 2015. "Migration, remittances and educational levels of household members left behind: Evidence from rural Morocco," Working Papers 2015-2016_3, CATT - UPPA - Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour, revised Sep 2015.
  • Handle: RePEc:tac:wpaper:2015-2016_3
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    Cited by:

    1. Khraiche, Maroula & Boudreau, James, 2020. "Can lower remittance costs improve human capital accumulation in Africa?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 42(5), pages 1000-1021.
    2. Cornelia Serena, PASCA, 2016. "Monetary Remittance - Romania Case Study," Contemporary Economy Journal, Constantin Brancoveanu University, vol. 1(3), pages 50-59.
    3. Annie L. Hines & Nicole B. Simpson, 2019. "Migration, remittances and human capital investment in Kenya," Economic Notes, Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena SpA, vol. 48(3), November.
    4. Tiza, Fahana Tahi & Farid, Kazi Shek & Mozumdar, Lavlu, 2020. "Impact Of Remittances On Educational Attainment Of The Migrant Households: A Micro Level Study," Bangladesh Journal of Agricultural Economics, Bangladesh Agricultural University, vol. 40(1&2), February.
    5. José R. Bucheli & Alok K. Bohara & Matías Fontenla, 2018. "Mixed effects of remittances on child education," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 8(1), pages 1-18, December.
    6. Jamal Bouoiyour & Amal Miftah & Christophe Muller, 2017. "Maghreb Rural-Urban Migration: The Movement to Morocco’s Towns," Working Papers 1082, Economic Research Forum, revised 04 Oct 2017.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    International migration; Education; Remittances; Morocco;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa

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