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Do Financial Flows raise or reduce Economic growth Volatility? Some Lessons from Moroccan case

Listed author(s):
  • Bouoiyour, Jamal
  • Miftah, Amal
  • Selmi, Refk

The purpose of the paper is twofold. Firstly, it attempts to analyze accurately the volatility of economic growth and financial flows (i.e. remittances and FDI) in the case of Morocco. Secondly, it tries to address the possible effects of these financial flows on the economic growth. We provide evidence that remittances are less volatile than FDI in terms of duration of persistence, intensity of shock and the “volatility clustering”. Furthermore, remittances can smooth the volatility of growth, while FDI flows sustain and aggravate it. Altruistic foundations, counter-cyclicality and concentration of remittances in Europe have been advanced as elements of explanation of these outcomes. Similarly, foreign investors seeking only profits have a pro-cyclical behavior and are greatly sensitive to economic conditions in the country of origin.

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File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/57258/1/MPRA_paper_57258.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 57258.

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Date of creation: 11 Jul 2014
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:57258
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  1. Valero-Gil, Jorge, 2008. "Remittances and the household’s expenditures on health," MPRA Paper 9572, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Bauwens Luc & Storti Giuseppe, 2009. "A Component GARCH Model with Time Varying Weights," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 13(2), pages 1-33, May.
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  6. bouoiyour, jamal, 2008. "Diaspora et dévelopement: Quelles intercations dans le cas marocain?
    [Diaspora and developement: What intercations in the Moroccan case?]
    ," MPRA Paper 37216, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Boris Pleskovic & Joseph E. Stiglitz, 2000. "Annual World Bank Conference on Development Economics 1999," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13839, September.
  8. Ralph Chami & Connel Fullenkamp & Samir Jahjah, 2005. "Are Immigrant Remittance Flows a Source of Capital for Development?," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 52(1), pages 55-81, April.
  9. Bouoiyour, Jamal & Miftah, Amal, 2014. "The effects of remittances on poverty and inequality: Evidence from rural southern Morocco," MPRA Paper 55686, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. El-Sakka, M. I. T. & McNabb, Robert, 1999. "The Macroeconomic Determinants of Emigrant Remittances," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(8), pages 1493-1502, August.
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  12. Alfaro, Laura & Chanda, Areendam & Kalemli-Ozcan, Sebnem & Sayek, Selin, 2010. "Does foreign direct investment promote growth? Exploring the role of financial markets on linkages," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 242-256, March.
  13. Tim Bollerslev, 2008. "Glossary to ARCH (GARCH)," CREATES Research Papers 2008-49, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
  14. Zakoian, Jean-Michel, 1994. "Threshold heteroskedastic models," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 931-955, September.
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    [Remittances of Moroccan migrants: Levers of growth and development]
    ," MPRA Paper 50537, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  16. Niels Hermes & Robert Lensink, 2003. "Foreign direct investment, financial development and economic growth," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(1), pages 142-163.
  17. Chami Ralph & Hakura Dalia S. & Montiel Peter J., 2012. "Do Worker Remittances Reduce Output Volatility in Developing Countries?," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 3(1), pages 1-25, June.
  18. Bollerslev, Tim, 1986. "Generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 307-327, April.
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  21. Patrick GUILLAUMONT & Maëlan LE GOFF, 2010. "Aid and remittances: their stabilizing impact compared," Working Papers P12, FERDI.
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  25. repec:dau:papers:123456789/13287 is not listed on IDEAS
  26. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Pozo, Susan, 2004. "Workers' Remittances and the Real Exchange Rate: A Paradox of Gifts," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(8), pages 1407-1417, August.
  27. Jamal Bouoiyour & Refk Selmi, 2014. "Commodity price uncertainty and manufactured exports in Morocco and Tunisia: Some insights from a novel GARCH model," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(1), pages 220-233.
  28. Engle, Robert F & Lilien, David M & Robins, Russell P, 1987. "Estimating Time Varying Risk Premia in the Term Structure: The Arch-M Model," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(2), pages 391-407, March.
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