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The effects of remittances on poverty and inequality: Evidence from rural southern Morocco

Author

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  • Bouoiyour, Jamal
  • Miftah, Amal

Abstract

In this paper, we examine the effect of migrants’ remittances on poverty and inequality. The survey data were collected in Morocco, in the rural areas of the region Souss-Massa-Draa. By applying an original approach, we estimate the counterfactual income of remittance-recipient households corresponding to a hypothetical value of its average income calculated for a scenario without remittances; this is then compared with its current income. We find that the poverty rate and the vulnerability of non-poor households are significantly dropped due to remittances. Our findings also suggest that remittance inflows have increased income inequality compared to the no-migration counterfactual situation.

Suggested Citation

  • Bouoiyour, Jamal & Miftah, Amal, 2014. "The effects of remittances on poverty and inequality: Evidence from rural southern Morocco," MPRA Paper 55686, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:55686
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Valero-Gil, Jorge, 2008. "Remittances and the household’s expenditures on health," MPRA Paper 9572, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. I-Ling Shen & Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2010. "Remittances and inequality: a dynamic migration model," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 8(2), pages 197-220, June.
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    4. Taylor, J. Edward & Mora, Jorge & Adams, Richard H., Jr. & Lopez-Feldman, Alejandro, 2005. "Remittances, Inequality and Poverty: Evidence from Rural Mexico," Working Papers 60287, University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    5. Ali Mansoor & Bryce Quillin, 2007. "Migration and Remittances : Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6920.
    6. Calero, Carla & Bedi, Arjun S. & Sparrow, Robert, 2009. "Remittances, Liquidity Constraints and Human Capital Investments in Ecuador," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 1143-1154, June.
    7. Ralph Chami & Connel Fullenkamp & Samir Jahjah, 2005. "Are Immigrant Remittance Flows a Source of Capital for Development?," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 52(1), pages 55-81, April.
    8. John Anyanwu & Andrew E. O. Erhijakpor, 2010. "Do International Remittances Affect Poverty in Africa?," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 22(1), pages 51-91.
    9. Richard P.C. Brown & Eliana Jimenez, 2008. "Estimating the net effects of migration and remittances on poverty and inequality: comparison of Fiji and Tonga," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(4), pages 547-571.
    10. Rapoport, Hillel & Docquier, Frederic, 2006. "The Economics of Migrants' Remittances," Handbook on the Economics of Giving, Reciprocity and Altruism, Elsevier.
    11. Acosta, Pablo & Fajnzylber, Pablo & Lopez, J. Humberto, 2007. "The impact of remittances on poverty and human capital : evidence from Latin American household surveys," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4247, The World Bank.
    12. Mckenzie, David & Rapoport, Hillel, 2007. "Network effects and the dynamics of migration and inequality: Theory and evidence from Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 1-24, September.
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    1. Estimation of the net effects of remittances on poverty and inequality. Evidence from rural southern Morocco
      by pmakdissi in NEP-ARA blog on 2014-10-15 03:08:47

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    Cited by:

    1. Bouoiyour, Jamal & Miftah, Amal & Selmi, Refk, 2014. "Do Financial Flows raise or reduce Economic growth Volatility? Some Lessons from Moroccan case," MPRA Paper 57258, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Remittances; Poverty; Income distribution; Morocco.;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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