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Economic volatility and remittances: evidence from SIDS

Author

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  • Mahalia Jackman
  • Roland Craigwell
  • Winston Moore

Abstract

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential link between remittances and economic volatility in small island developing states. Design/methodology/approach - The paper estimates a panel data model using a database containing 20 small island developing states (SIDS) observed over annual intervals between 1986 and 2005. Findings - The results suggest that, in general, remittance flows have a stabilising influence on output and investment volatility. However, given the importance of these flows to SIDS, the volatility of remittances also has a significant and positive impact on both investment and consumption volatility. Practical implications - The policy implications of the study's findings is that SIDS (similar to how oil-producing nations take oil price fluctuations into account when considering policy changes) may have to monitor and forecast future remittance flows and take these projections into account when making changes to either their monetary or fiscal policy stance. Originality/value - Workers' remittances have grown dramatically worldwide, particularly in SIDS, where they constitute one of the main sources of foreign exchange. Given the importance of these flows to economic growth and development in these countries, this study examines the potential link between remittances and economic volatility.

Suggested Citation

  • Mahalia Jackman & Roland Craigwell & Winston Moore, 2009. "Economic volatility and remittances: evidence from SIDS," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 36(2), pages 135-146, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:jespps:v:36:y:2009:i:2:p:135-146
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sarah Jacobson & Ragan Petrie, 2014. "Favor trading in public good provision," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 17(3), pages 439-460, September.
    2. Ahamada, Ibrahim & Coulibaly, Dramane, 2011. "How does financial development influence the impact of remittances on growth volatility?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 2748-2760.
    3. Syed Naimul Wadood & Md. Amzad Hossain, 2017. "Microeconomic impact of remittances on household welfare: Evidences from Bangladesh," Business and Economic Horizons (BEH), Prague Development Center, vol. 13(1), pages 10-29, March.
    4. Wadood, Syed Naimul & Hossain, Md. Amzad, 2015. "Impact of Overseas Remittances on Economic Growth: Evidences from Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 81657, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Chami Ralph & Hakura Dalia S. & Montiel Peter J., 2012. "Do Worker Remittances Reduce Output Volatility in Developing Countries?," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 3(1), pages 1-25, June.
    6. Harvey W. Armstrong & Robert Read, 2020. "Size And Sectoral Specialisation: The Asymmetric Cross‐Country Impacts Of The 2008 Crisis And Its Aftermath," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 32(6), pages 891-921, August.
    7. Roland Craigwell & Mahalia Jackman & Winston Moore, 2010. "Economic volatility and remittances," International Journal of Development Issues, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 9(1), pages 25-42, April.
    8. Muhammad Shahbaz & Ijaz Rehman & Nurul Mahdzan, 2014. "Linkages between income inequality, international remittances and economic growth in Pakistan," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 48(3), pages 1511-1535, May.
    9. Opperman, Pieter & Adjasi, Charles Komla Delali, 2019. "Remittance volatility and financial sector development in sub-Saharan African countries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 336-351.
    10. Aziz, M. Nusrate & Sen, Somnath & Sun, Puyang & Wu, Lichao, 2015. "Migrant Workers’ Remittances and Economic Growth: The Role of Financial Development," MPRA Paper 66992, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Cooray Arusha & Mallick Debdulal, 2013. "International business cycles and remittance flows," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 13(1), pages 1-33, September.
    12. Anwar, Sajid & Cooray, Arusha, 2015. "Financial flows and per capita income in developing countries," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 304-314.
    13. Mahalia Jackman, 2014. "A Note on the Labor Market Effects of Remittances in Latin American and Caribbean Countries: Do Thresholds Exist?," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 52(1), pages 52-67, March.
    14. Gloria Clarissa O. Dzeha, 2016. "The decipher, theory or empirics: a review of remittance studies," African Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Finance, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 5(2), pages 113-134.
    15. Seidu, Ayuba & Onel, Gulcan & Moss, Charles Britt, 2018. "Impact of International Remittance on Out-Farm Labor Migration in Developing Countries: A Dynamic Panel Data Analysis," 2018 Annual Meeting, February 2-6, 2018, Jacksonville, Florida 266531, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    16. Bouoiyour, Jamal & Miftah, Amal & Selmi, Refk, 2014. "Do Financial Flows raise or reduce Economic growth Volatility? Some Lessons from Moroccan case," MPRA Paper 57258, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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