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How does financial development influence the impact of remittances on growth volatility?

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  • Ibrahim Ahamada

    () (CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, PSE - Paris School of Economics)

  • Dramane Coulibaly

    ()

Abstract

This paper empirically examines how financial development influences the impact of remittances on GDP growth volatility. This empirical study is conducted using the panel smooth transition regression (PSTR) approach. The results show that the impact of remittances on GDP growth volatility is nonlinear and changes over time and across countries in function of financial development. More precisely, a high level of financial development helps remittances to have a high stabilizing impact. Therefore, public authorities in remittance recipient countries might implement policies that promote the financial sector in order to allow a high stabilizing impact of remittances.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Ibrahim Ahamada & Dramane Coulibaly, 2011. "How does financial development influence the impact of remittances on growth volatility?," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-00629898, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:cesptp:hal-00629898
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00629898
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:taf:jdevst:v:54:y:2018:i:3:p:481-500 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Coulibaly, Dramane, 2015. "Remittances and financial development in Sub-Saharan African countries: A system approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 249-258.
    3. Couharde, Cécile & Generoso, Rémi, 2015. "The ambiguous role of remittances in West African countries facing climate variability," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(04), pages 493-515, August.
    4. Giulia Bettin & Alberto Zazzaro, 2018. "The Impact of Natural Disasters on Remittances to Low- and Middle-Income Countries," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 54(3), pages 481-500, March.
    5. Anwar, Sajid & Cooray, Arusha, 2015. "Financial flows and per capita income in developing countries," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 304-314.
    6. Ilham Haouas & Naceur Kheraief & Arusha Cooray & Syed Jawad Hussain Shahzad, 2019. "Time-Varying Casual Nexuses Between Remittances and Financial Development in Some MENA Countries," Working Papers 1294, Economic Research Forum, revised 2019.
    7. repec:lje:journl:v:23:y:2018:i:1:p:97-141 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Jakhongir Kakhkharov, 2018. "Remittances and financial development in transition economies," Discussion Papers in Finance finance:201803, Griffith University, Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics.
    9. Katsushi S. Imai & Bilal Malaeb & Fabrizio Bresciani, 2016. "Remittances, Growth and Poverty Reduction in Asia - A Critical Review of the Literature and the New Evidence from Cross-country Panel Data," Discussion Paper Series DP2016-28, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
    10. Ahmat Jidoud, 2015. "Remittances and Macroeconomic Volatility in African Countries," IMF Working Papers 15/49, International Monetary Fund.
    11. repec:bap:journl:190203 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Aziz, M. Nusrate & Sen, Somnath & Sun, Puyang & Wu, Lichao, 2015. "Migrant Workers’ Remittances and Economic Growth: The Role of Financial Development," MPRA Paper 66992, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Kakhkharov, Jakhongir & Akimov, Alexandr & Rohde, Nicholas, 2017. "Transaction costs and recorded remittances in the post-Soviet economies: Evidence from a new dataset on bilateral flows," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 98-107.
    14. Williams, Kevin, 2017. "Do remittances improve political institutions? Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 65-75.
    15. repec:spr:empeco:v:56:y:2019:i:3:d:10.1007_s00181-017-1375-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Mahalia Jackman, 2014. "A Note on the Labor Market Effects of Remittances in Latin American and Caribbean Countries: Do Thresholds Exist?," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 52(1), pages 52-67, March.
    17. Gloria Clarissa O. Dzeha, 2016. "The decipher, theory or empirics: a review of remittance studies," African Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Finance, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 5(2), pages 113-134.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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