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International business cycles and remittance flows

Listed author(s):
  • Cooray Arusha

    (School of Economics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia)

  • Mallick Debdulal

    ()

    (School of Accounting, Economics and Finance, 70 Elgar Road, Burwood, Victoria 3125, Australia, and Alfred Deakin Research Institute)

In this paper, we study the macroeconomic determinants of remittance flows. We place particular attention to fluctuations in remittance flows over the international business cycles. Estimating a dynamic panel data model using the system-GMM method over the period 1970–2007, we document that remittance inflows decrease with home country volatility. Contrarily, remittance inflows increase with the volatility in host countries, especially for middle-income countries. Lower interest rates in host countries lead to larger remittance outflows. Trade and capital account openness are the most important factors that determine both remittance inflows and outflows. We conclude that macroeconomic factors of both home and host countries are important for understanding remittance flows.

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Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics.

Volume (Year): 13 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 (September)
Pages: 1-33

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Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejmac:v:13:y:2013:i:1:p:33:n:22
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