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Adaptive Efficiency and Pragmatic Flexibility: Characteristics of Institutional Change in Capitalism, Chinese-style

In: Institutional Variety in East Asia

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  • Joachim Ahrens
  • Patrick Jünemann

Abstract

This illuminating book broadly addresses the emerging field of ‘diversity of capitalism’ from a comparative institutional approach. It explores the varied patterns for achieving coordination in different economic systems, applying them specifically to China, Japan and South Korea. These countries are of particular interest due to the fact that they are often considered to have developed their own peculiar blend of models of capitalism.

Suggested Citation

  • Joachim Ahrens & Patrick Jünemann, 2011. "Adaptive Efficiency and Pragmatic Flexibility: Characteristics of Institutional Change in Capitalism, Chinese-style," Chapters, in: Werner Pascha & Cornelia Storz & Markus Taube (ed.),Institutional Variety in East Asia, chapter 2, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14221_2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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