IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Remittances, savings and return migration under uncertainty

  • DELPIERRE Matthieu
  • VERHEYDEN Bertrand

Recent empirical evidence links migrant remittances and return migration, and stresses the impact of uncertainty on migrant decisions. Theoretical analyses of the motives for remittances generally neglect these features, and do not include alternative strategies such as savings, which potentially have very different implications for both migrants and origin countries. This paper presents a model of endogenous remittances, savings and return decisions under uncertainty. This setting, which applies to long-term international migration, addresses the following questions. Which migrant characteristics affect their remittance-saving portfolio decisions? How do these decisions interact with migration success and return plans? In our framework, migrants make remittance and saving decisions at an early stage of migration, when migration success and return options are uncertain. Over time, information about professional prospects is acquired, and conditionally on past decisions, migrants adjust their return plans. We show that migrants anticipating a large wage in the host country, or a relatively low risk of migration failure are less likely to remit and to return, and more likely to save. These results are in line with recent empirical evidence, such as the large share of non-remitting migrants, the fact that migrants facing higher risks are more likely to remit, and the potentially poor economic performance of returnees. Finally, we provide a rationale for the support by relatives in the sending country of low-skill, illegal migration.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.ceps.lu/publi_viewer.cfm?tmp=2530
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by LISER in its series LISER Working Paper Series with number 2014-01.

as
in new window

Length: 40 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:irs:cepswp:2014-01
Contact details of provider: Postal: 3, avenue de la Fonte, L-4364 Esch-sur-Alzette, G.-D. Luxembourg
Phone: 00352 / 58 58 55 - 1
Fax: 00352 / 58 58 55 - 700
Web page: http://www.liser.lu

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Calero, Carla & Bedi, Arjun S. & Sparrow, Robert, 2008. "Remittances, Liquidity Constraints and Human Capital Investments in Ecuador," IZA Discussion Papers 3358, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Auriol, Emmanuelle & Demonsant, Jean-Luc, 2011. "Education and Migration Choices in Hierarchical Societies: The Case of Matam, Senegal," CEPR Discussion Papers 8311, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Giulia BETTIN & Riccardo LUCCHETTI & Alberto ZAZZARO, 2011. "Endogeneity and sample selection in a model for remittances," Working Papers 361, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
  4. Raymundo M. Campos Vázquez & Jaime Lara Lara, 2011. "Self-Selection Patterns among Return Migrants: Mexico 1990-2010," Serie documentos de trabajo del Centro de Estudios Económicos 2011-09, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos.
  5. Carlo Alcaraz & Daniel Chiquiar & Alejandrina Salcedo, 2010. "Remittances, Schooling, and Child Labor in Mexico," Working Papers 2010-14, Banco de México.
  6. Poirine, Bernard, 1997. "A theory of remittances as an implicit family loan arrangement," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 589-611, January.
  7. Gertrud Schrieder & Beatrice Knerr, 2000. "Labour Migration as a Social Security Mechanism for Smallholder Households in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case of Cameroon," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(2), pages 223-236.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:irs:cepswp:2014-01. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Library and Documentation)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.