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The Impact of Remittances on Child Education in Pakistan

Author

Listed:
  • Sami Ullah Khan

    () (Ph.D Scholar at Institute of Management Sciences, Peshawar.)

  • Muhammad Jehangir Khan

    () (Assistant Professor at Pakistan Institute of Development Economics (PIDE), Islamabad.)

Abstract

This study examines the impact of remittances on school enrollment and the level of education attained among children aged 4–15 years in Pakistan. It uses a nationally representative survey, the Pakistan Social and Living Standards Measurement Survey for 2010/11. The migrant network variable at the village level interacting with the number of adults at the household level is used as an instrument for remittances. The results of the IV probit model show that children from remittance-receiving households are more likely to enroll in school. The marginal impact of remittances on school enrollment is larger for girls and for rural households. Hence, remittances help reduce regional and gender disparities in child school enrollment in Pakistan. The IV censored ordered probit model is used to investigate the impact of remittances on children’s grade attainment. The estimated impact is negative and significant, except for urban children, lowering the probability that a child will move to a higher grade.

Suggested Citation

  • Sami Ullah Khan & Muhammad Jehangir Khan, 2016. "The Impact of Remittances on Child Education in Pakistan," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 21(1), pages 69-98, Jan-June.
  • Handle: RePEc:lje:journl:v:21:y:2016:i:1:p:69-98
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    File URL: http://www.lahoreschoolofeconomics.edu.pk/EconomicsJournal/Journals/Volume%2021/Issue%201/03%20Khan%20and%20Khan%20ED%20ttc.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child education; school enrollment; educational attainment; remittances.;

    JEL classification:

    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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