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Schooling and Educational Attainment: Evidence from Bangladesh

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  • Pushkar Maitra

Abstract

Education and human capital accumulation are essential components of economic development. The present paper attempts to identify some of the individual and household level characteristics that affect the demand for schooling in Bangladesh. I examine the current enrolment status of children aged 6-12 and the highest grade attained for children aged 13-24. The first is estimated using a standard probit model and the second using a censored ordered probit model. Estimation results show that there is no gender differential in current enrolment status but grade attainment is higher for girls, relative to boys. An increase in the permanent income of the household is always associated with an increase in educational attainment. Parental education has a positive and statistically significant effect on the educational attainment of children, and mother's education has a stronger effect on both school enrolment and grade attainment of children compared with father's education.

Suggested Citation

  • Pushkar Maitra, 2003. "Schooling and Educational Attainment: Evidence from Bangladesh," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 129-153.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:11:y:2003:i:2:p:129-153
    DOI: 10.1080/09645290210131665
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Shafiq, M. Najeeb, 2007. "Household schooling and child labor decisions in rural Bangladesh," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 946-966, December.
    2. Rasheda Khanam & Russell Ross, 2011. "Is child work a deterrent to school attendance and school attainment?: Evidence from Bangladesh," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(8), pages 692-713, July.
    3. Francesca Marchetta & David E. Sahn, 2016. "The Role of Education and Family Background in Marriage, Childbearing, and Labor Market Participation in Senegal," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64(2), pages 369-403.
    4. Andrew Foster & Sveta Milusheva, 2015. "Household Recombination, Retrospective Evaluation, and the Effects of a Health and Family Planning Intervention," Working Papers id:7183, eSocialSciences.
    5. repec:bla:rdevec:v:21:y:2017:i:4:p:1158-1177 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. David McKenzie & Hillel Rapoport, 2011. "Can migration reduce educational attainment? Evidence from Mexico," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(4), pages 1331-1358, October.
    7. Mussa, Richard, 2009. "Household economic status, schooling costs, and schooling bias against non-biological children in Malawi," MPRA Paper 15855, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 21 Jun 2009.
    8. J. Driessen & A. Razzaque & D. Walker & D. Canning, 2015. "The effect of childhood measles vaccination on school enrolment in Matlab, Bangladesh," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(55), pages 6019-6040, November.
    9. Ragui Assaad & Djavad Salehi-Isfahani & Rana Hendy, 2014. "Inequality of Opportunity in Educational Attainment in Middle East and North Africa: Evidence from Household Surveys," Working Papers 834, Economic Research Forum, revised May 2014.
    10. Köllner, Sebastian, 2013. "Remittances and educational attainment: Evidence from Tajikistan," Discussion Paper Series 124, Julius Maximilian University of Würzburg, Chair of Economic Order and Social Policy.
    11. David McKenzie & Hillel Rapoport, 2006. "Can Migration Reduce Educational Attainments? Depressing Evidence from Mexico," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0601, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    12. Mary Arends-Kuenning & Suzanne Duryea, 2006. "The Effect of Parental Presence, Parents’ Education, and Household Headship on Adolescents’ Schooling and Work in Latin America," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 263-286, June.
    13. Sami Ullah Khan & Muhammad Jehangir Khan, 2016. "The Impact of Remittances on Child Education in Pakistan," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 21(1), pages 69-98, Jan-June.
    14. Khanam, Rasheda & Ross, Russell, 2005. "Impact of Child Labour on School Attendance and School Attainment: Evidence from Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 9397, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Apr 2008.
    15. Jigme Nidup, 2016. "Determinants of School Enrolment in Bhutan: Does Income Matter to Poor?," Asian Journal of Economic Modelling, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 4(2), pages 95-103, June.
    16. Jad Chaaban & Wael Mansour, 2012. "The Impact of Remittances on Education in Jordan, Syria and Lebanon," Working Papers 684, Economic Research Forum, revised 2012.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Schooling; Education Attainment; Censored Ordered Probit; Bangladesh;

    JEL classification:

    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities

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