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Maternal Education and Child Attainment in Jamaica: Testing the Bargaining Power Hypothesis

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  • Handa, Sudhanshu

Abstract

In a bargaining model of household decision-making, any variable reflecting the outside opportunities of household members will influence household demand patterns. Mother's education has been found to be an important determinant of children's education and health outcomes. This paper argues that, within a bargaining framework, mother's education may influence children's health and education by shifting bargaining power within the household. An empirical strategy is developed and applied to data on teenage grade attainment and school enrollment in Jamaica. The results support the bargaining power hypothesis and imply a broader role for mother's education than has previously been considered. Copyright 1996 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Suggested Citation

  • Handa, Sudhanshu, 1996. "Maternal Education and Child Attainment in Jamaica: Testing the Bargaining Power Hypothesis," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 58(1), pages 119-137, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:58:y:1996:i:1:p:119-37
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    Cited by:

    1. Pushkar Maitra, 2003. "Schooling and Educational Attainment: Evidence from Bangladesh," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 129-153.
    2. Raymond B. Frempong & David Stadelmann, 2017. "Does Female Education have a Bargaining Effect on Household Welfare? Evidence from Ghana and Uganda," CREMA Working Paper Series 2017-08, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    3. Handa, Sudhanshu, 1998. "Gender and life-cycle differences in the impact of schooling on chronic disease in Jamaica," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 325-336, June.
    4. World Bank, 2003. "Jamaica - The Road to Sustained Growth : Country Economic Memorandum," World Bank Other Operational Studies 14666, The World Bank.
    5. Holmes, Jessica, 2003. "Measuring the determinants of school completion in Pakistan: analysis of censoring and selection bias," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 249-264, June.
    6. Monazza Aslam & Geeta Gandhi Kingdon, 2008. "Gender and household education expenditure in Pakistan," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(20), pages 2573-2591.

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