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Measuring the Determinants of School Completion in Pakistan: Analysis of Censoring and Selection Bias

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  • Jessica Holmes

Abstract

This paper explores the demand for child schooling in Pakistan, using the Pakistan Integrated Household Survey (1991). There have been few such studies for Pakistan, a country with relatively low enrollment rates and education levels, high illiteracy, and large disparity between male and female education. Additionally, this study focuses on two potential sources of bias in the estimation of the demand for schooling. First, studies which do not distinguish between currently enrolled children and those who completed their schooling subject their estimates to a form of censoring bias, Second, studies which exclude children who have left the household from their samples may introduce sample selection bias if the decisions to leave home and to attend school are related. This study finds evidence of both "censoring" and "sample selection" bias in the demand for child schooling in Pakistan.

Suggested Citation

  • Jessica Holmes, 1999. "Measuring the Determinants of School Completion in Pakistan: Analysis of Censoring and Selection Bias," Working Papers 794, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  • Handle: RePEc:egc:wpaper:794
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    File URL: http://www.econ.yale.edu/growth_pdf/cdp794.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. World Bank, 2005. "Pakistan : Country Gender Assessment, Bridging the Gender Gap, Opportunities and Challenges," World Bank Other Operational Studies 8453, The World Bank.
    2. Sibel Selim, 2013. "A comparative analysis on school attainment in Turkey and Malta: application of the Tobit model," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 47(5), pages 2709-2722, August.
    3. Michael Clemens, 2004. "The Long Walk to School: International Education Goals in Historical Perspective," Working Papers 37, Center for Global Development.
    4. Holmes, Jessica, 2003. "Measuring the determinants of school completion in Pakistan: analysis of censoring and selection bias," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 249-264, June.
    5. Idil GOKSEL, "undated". "The determinants of the School Attainment in Turkey and the Imapct of the Extension of the Compulsory Education," EcoMod2008 23800045, EcoMod.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • C24 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models; Threshold Regression Models

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