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Market Returns, Transfers and Demand for Schooling in Malaysia, 1976-89

Author

Listed:
  • Kathryn Anderson
  • Elizabeth King
  • Yan Wang

Abstract

If parents expect higher market returns to schooling or additional transfers from their children, they invest more in their children's schooling. Results from models of schooling demand using data from the Malaysian Family Life Surveys of 1976 and 1989 suggest that market returns of mothers but not fathers positively affected schooling. The propensity for parents to spend time with their parents had a small positive effect on education of daughters, but other transfers had a weak negative effect. The results suggest that if one generation perceives a low return to schooling, then the next generation - especially daughters - pays the price of lower schooling.

Suggested Citation

  • Kathryn Anderson & Elizabeth King & Yan Wang, 2003. "Market Returns, Transfers and Demand for Schooling in Malaysia, 1976-89," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(3), pages 1-28.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:39:y:2003:i:3:p:1-28
    DOI: 10.1080/00220380412331322801
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Victor Hiller, 2014. "Gender Inequality, Endogenous Cultural Norms, and Economic Development," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 116(2), pages 455-481, April.
    2. Elizabeth M. King & Peter F. Orazem & Elizabeth M. Paterno, 2016. "Promotion with and without Learning: Effects on Student Enrollment and Dropout Behavior," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 30(3), pages 580-602.
    3. Nadir Altinok & Abdurrahman Aydemir, 2015. "The Unfolding of Gender Gap in Education," Working Papers halshs-01204805, HAL.
    4. Yamauchi, Futoshi & Liu, Yanyan, 2011. "Girls take over: Long-term impacts of an early stage education intervention in the Philippines," IFPRI discussion papers 1144, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Dancer, Diane M. & Rammohan, Anu, 2004. "The Determinants of Schooling in Egypt: The Role of Gender and Rural-Urban Residence," Working Papers 1, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
    6. Dancer, Diane M. & Rammohan, Anu, 2004. "Gender Differences in Schooling Attainment: The Role of Sibling Characteristics and Birth Order Effects," Working Papers 5, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
    7. Alderman, Harold & King, Elizabeth M., 1998. "Gender differences in parental investment in education," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 453-468, December.
    8. Jessica Holmes, 1999. "Measuring the Determinants of School Completion in Pakistan: Analysis of Censoring and Selection Bias," Working Papers 794, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    9. Kenneth A. Swinnerton, 2016. "How do adult returns to schooling affect children’s enrollment?," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 305-305, October.
    10. Nerman, Måns & Owens, Trudy, 2010. "The Push Towards UPE and the Determinants of the Demand for Education in Tanzania," Working Papers in Economics 472, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics, revised 13 Mar 2012.
    11. Yamauchi, Futoshi & Liu, Yanyan, 2012. "School quality, labor markets and human capital investments : long-term impacts of an early stage education intervention in the Philippines," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6247, The World Bank.
    12. Lindskog, Annika, 2011. "Does a Diversification Motive Influence Children’s School Entry in the Ethiopian Highlands?," Working Papers in Economics 494, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.

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