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Can Migration Reduce Educational Attainments? Depressing Evidence from Mexico

Author

Listed:
  • David McKenzie

    () (Development Research Group, World Bank)

  • Hillel Rapoport

    () (Department of Economics, Bar-Ilan University, CADRE, University of Lille II, and Stanford Center for International Development)

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of migration on educational attainments in rural Mexico. Using historical migration rates by state to instrument for current migration, we find evidence of a significant negative effect of migration on schooling attendance and attainments of 12 to 18 year-old boys and of 16 to 18 year-old girls. IV-Censored Ordered Probit results show that living in a migrant household lowers the chances of boys completing junior high-school and of boys and girls completing high-school. The negative effect of migration on schooling is somewhat mitigated for younger girls with low educated mothers, which is consistent with remittances relaxing credit constraints on education investment for the very poor. However, for the majority of rural Mexican children, family migration depresses educational attainment. Comparison of the marginal effects of migration on school attendance and on participation to other activities shows that the observed decrease in schooling of 16 to 18 year olds is accounted for by current migration of boys and increases in housework for girls.

Suggested Citation

  • David McKenzie & Hillel Rapoport, 2006. "Can Migration Reduce Educational Attainments? Depressing Evidence from Mexico," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0601, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  • Handle: RePEc:crm:wpaper:0601
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. A. Gentili & L. Ferretti, 2013. "Cumulative Causation at Work: Intergenerational Transfers and Social Capital in a Spatially Varied Economy," Working Papers wp868, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    2. Delphine Boutin, 2011. "Envoi de fonds et allocation du temps des enfants au Niger : L'effet indirect des chocs négatifs," Working Papers hal-00637607, HAL.
    3. Adriana Jaramillo & Alan Ruby & Fabrice Henard & Hafedh Zaafrane, 2011. "Internationalization of Higher Education in MENA : Policy Issues Associated with Skills Formation and Mobility," World Bank Other Operational Studies 19461, The World Bank.
    4. Azzarri, Carlo & Zezza, Alberto, 2011. "International migration and nutritional outcomes in Tajikistan," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 54-70, February.
    5. Bugamelli, Matteo & Paternò, Francesco, 2009. "Do Workers' Remittances Reduce the Probability of Current Account Reversals?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 1821-1838, December.
    6. Christian Hubert Ebeke, 2010. "The Effect of Remittances on Child Labor: Cross-Country Evidence," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 30(1), pages 351-364.
    7. Görlich, Dennis & Omar Mahmoud, Toman & Trebesch, Christoph, 2007. "Explaining labour market inactivity in migrant-sending families: Housework, hammock, or higher education?," Kiel Working Papers 1391, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    8. Dreby, Joanna, 2015. "U.S. immigration policy and family separation: The consequences for children's well-being," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 245-251.
    9. Nicola D. Coniglio & Giuseppe De Arcangelis & Laura Serlenga, 2009. "Clandestine Migrants: Do the High-Skilled Return Home First?," Working Papers 80, Sapienza University of Rome, CIDEI.
    10. Nguyen, Cuong Viet & Nguyen, Hoa Quynh, 2015. "Do internal and international remittances matter to health, education and labor of children and adolescents? The case of Vietnam," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 28-34.
    11. Adam Sawyer, 2016. "Is Money Enough?: The Effect of Migrant Remittances on Parental Aspirations and Youth Educational Attainment in Rural Mexico," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 231-266, March.
    12. repec:laf:wpaper:201105 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Yi, Hongmei & Zhang, Linxiu & Ma, Xiaochen & Congdon, Nathan & Shi, Yaojiang & Pang, Xiaopeng & Zeng, Junxia & Wang, Lei & Boswell, Matthew & Rozelle, Scott, 2015. "Poor vision among China's rural primary school students: Prevalence, correlates and consequences," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 247-262.
    14. Viet Nguyen, Cuong, 2016. "Does parental migration really benefit left-behind children? Comparative evidence from Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 230-239.
    15. Cristina Cattaneo, 2012. "Migrants’ international transfers and educational expenditure," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 20(1), pages 163-193, January.
    16. Gianna Claudia Giannelli & Lucia Mangiavacchi, 2010. "Children's Schooling and Parental Migration: Empirical Evidence on the ‘Left‐behind’ Generation in Albania," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 24(s1), pages 76-92, December.
    17. Asmaa Elbadawy & Rania Roushdy, 2010. "Impact of International Migration and Remittances on Child Schooling and Child Work: The Case of Egypt," Working Papers 545, Economic Research Forum, revised 09 Jan 2010.
    18. Liliana Meza González & Liliana Meza González & Carla Pederzini Villarreal, 2009. "Migración internacional y escolaridad como medios alternativos de movilidad social: el caso de México," Estudios Económicos, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos, vol. 0(Special i), pages 163-206.
    19. José Martínez, 2013. "Mexican Migrants to the United States: an Alternative Methodology," Ensayos Revista de Economia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Economia, vol. 0(1), pages 1-30, May.
    20. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Pozo, Susan, 2010. "Accounting for Remittance and Migration Effects on Children's Schooling," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(12), pages 1747-1759, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration; migrant networks; education attainments; Mexico;

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution

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