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The Effect of Childhood Measles Vaccination on School Enrollment in Matlab, Bangladesh

  • Julia Driessen

    ()

    (University of Pittsburgh)

  • Abdur Razzaque

    ()

    (International Center for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh)

  • Damian Walker

    ()

    (Johns Hopkins University)

  • David Canning

    ()

    (Harvard School of Public Health)

There is increasing evidence that early childhood health interventions have long term effects on cognitive development, educational achievement, and adult productivity. We examine the effect of measles vaccination on the school enrollment of children in Matlab, Bangladesh. An intensive measles vaccination program was introduced in two areas of Matlab in 1982, and extended to two more areas in 1985. Using this staggered rollout as an instrument for vaccination, we find that age appropriate vaccination raises the probability that a boy has enrolled in school by 9.5 percentage points but appears to have no effect on girls' enrollment.

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Paper provided by Program on the Global Demography of Aging in its series PGDA Working Papers with number 8111.

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Date of creation: Nov 2011
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Handle: RePEc:gdm:wpaper:8111
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/pgda

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  1. Michael A. Koenig & David Bishai & Mehrab Ali Khan, 2001. "Health Interventions and Health Equity: The Example of Measles Vaccination in Bangladesh," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 27(2), pages 283-302.
  2. Joshua D. Angrist, 2000. "Estimation of Limited-Dependent Variable Models with Dummy Endogenous Regressors: Simple Strategies for Empirical Practice," NBER Technical Working Papers 0248, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Harold Alderman & John Hoddinott & Bill Kinsey, 2004. "Long Term Consequences Of Early Childhood Malnutrition," HiCN Working Papers 09, Households in Conflict Network.
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  5. David Cutler & Winnie Fung & Michael Kremer & Monica Singhal & Tom Vogl, 2010. "Early-Life Malaria Exposure and Adult Outcomes: Evidence from Malaria Eradication in India," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 72-94, April.
  6. Adrienne M. Lucas, 2010. "Malaria Eradication and Educational Attainment: Evidence from Paraguay and Sri Lanka," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 46-71, April.
  7. David E. Bloom & David Canning & Mark Weston, 2005. "The Value of Vaccination," World Economics, World Economics, Economic & Financial Publishing, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 6(3), pages 15-39, July.
  8. David Canning & Abdur Razzaque & Julia Driessen & Damian G. Walker & Peter Kim Streatfield & Mohammad Yunus, 2011. "The Effect of Maternal Tetanus Immunization on Children’s Schooling Attainment in Matlab, Bangladesh: Follow-up of a Randomized Trial," PGDA Working Papers 7611, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
  9. Moffitt, Robert A, 2001. "Estimations of Limited Dependent Variable Models with Dummy Endogenous Regressors: Simple Strategies for Empirical Practice: Comment," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 19(1), pages 20-23, January.
  10. Till Bärnighausen & David E. Bloom & David Canning & A. Friedman & Orine Levine & Jennifer O'Brien & Lois Privor-Dumm & Damian Walker, 2010. "Rethinking the benefits and costs of childhood vaccination: the example of the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine," PGDA Working Papers 5610, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
  11. Imbens, Guido W, 2001. "Estimations of Limited Dependent Variable Models with Dummy Endogenous Regressors: Simple Strategies for Empirical Practice: Comment," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 19(1), pages 17-20, January.
  12. Hoyt Bleakley, 2010. "Malaria Eradication in the Americas: A Retrospective Analysis of Childhood Exposure," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 1-45, April.
  13. Edward Miguel & Michael Kremer, 2004. "Worms: Identifying Impacts on Education and Health in the Presence of Treatment Externalities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(1), pages 159-217, 01.
  14. David E. Bloom & David Canning & Erica S. Shenoy, 2012. "The effect of vaccination on children's physical and cognitive development in the Philippines," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(21), pages 2777-2783, July.
  15. Todd, Petra, 2001. "Estimations of Limited Dependent Variable Models with Dummy Endogenous Regressors: Simple Strategies for Empirical Practice: Comment," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 19(1), pages 25-27, January.
  16. Pushkar Maitra, 2001. "Schooling and Educational Attainment: Evidence from Bangladesh," ASARC Working Papers 2001-07, The Australian National University, Australia South Asia Research Centre.
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  18. Angrist, Joshua D, 2001. "Estimations of Limited Dependent Variable Models with Dummy Endogenous Regressors: Simple Strategies for Empirical Practice: Reply," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 19(1), pages 27-28, January.
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