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Early-Life Malaria Exposure and Adult Outcomes: Evidence from Malaria Eradication in India

  • David Cutler
  • Winnie Fung
  • Michael Kremer
  • Monica Singhal
  • Tom Vogl

We examine the effects of exposure to malaria in early childhood on educational attainment and economic status in adulthood by exploiting geographic variation in malaria prevalence in India prior to a nationwide eradication program in the 1950s. We find that the program led to modest increases in household per capita consumption for prime age men, and the effects for men are larger than those for women in most specifications. We find no evidence of increased educational attainment for men and mixed evidence for women. (JEL I12, I18, I21, 015, 018)

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Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Journal: Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 2 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 72-94

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Handle: RePEc:aea:aejapp:v:2:y:2010:i:2:p:72-94
Note: DOI: 10.1257/app.2.2.72
Contact details of provider: Web page: https://www.aeaweb.org/aej-applied
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References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Adrienne M. Lucas, 2011. "The Impact of Malaria Eradication on Fertility," Working Papers 11-20, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
  2. Alan I. Barreca, 2010. "The Long-Term Economic Impact of In Utero and Postnatal Exposure to Malaria," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(4), pages 865-892.
  3. Hoyt Bleakley, 2010. "Malaria Eradication in the Americas: A Retrospective Analysis of Childhood Exposure," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 1-45, April.
  4. Sharon Maccini & Dean Yang, 2009. "Under the Weather: Health, Schooling, and Economic Consequences of Early-Life Rainfall," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(3), pages 1006-26, June.
  5. Adrienne M. Lucas, 2010. "Malaria Eradication and Educational Attainment: Evidence from Paraguay and Sri Lanka," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 46-71, April.
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