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Revisiting the relationship between longevity and lifetime education: global evidence from 919 surveys

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  • Hoque, Mohammad Mainul
  • King, Elizabeth M.
  • Montenegro, Claudio E.
  • Orazem, Peter F.

Abstract

The contrasting results from previous research motivate this reexamination of the longevity-schooling relationship. The study uses a different identification strategy applied to cohort-specific data from 919 household surveys conducted between 1960 and 2012 spanning 147 countries. We find a significant positive relationship between increased life expectancy at birth and lifetime completed years of schooling in 95% of the surveys and significant negative effects only in 0.3%. In addition, parents’ own longer life expectancy at birth has intergenerational benefits for their children’s schooling. The 31-year increase in life expectancy at birth worldwide for birth cohorts 1922–1987 is associated with 60–100% of the 4.8 additional years of completed schooling for those birth cohorts. These results are robust for different specifications across surveys, population groups, and world regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Hoque, Mohammad Mainul & King, Elizabeth M. & Montenegro, Claudio E. & Orazem, Peter F., 2019. "Revisiting the relationship between longevity and lifetime education: global evidence from 919 surveys," ISU General Staff Papers 201901010800001031, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isu:genstf:201901010800001031
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General
    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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