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AIDS, Human Capital and Development

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  • Rody Manuelli

    (Washington University in St. Louis)

Abstract

In this paper I study a model in which the existence of a 'disease environment' influences parental investment in early childhood human capital and individual schooling and on the job training decisions. The model is used to analyze the effect of HIV/AIDS on aggregate output per worker. I use a calibrated version of the model to estimate the long run impact on output per worker of increasing life expectancy for individuals who have HIV/AIDS and reducing the rate of transmission of the disease in a subset of Sub-Saharan countries. I find that the effects on output per worker, the prevalence of the diseases and the growth rate of population can be substantial.

Suggested Citation

  • Rody Manuelli, 2015. "AIDS, Human Capital and Development," 2015 Meeting Papers 1193, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed015:1193
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    File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2015/paper_1193.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martine AUDIBERT & Pascale COMBES MOTEL & Alassane DRABO, 2010. "Global Burden of Disease and Economic Growth," Working Papers 201036, CERDI.
    2. Emily Oster, 2012. "Routes Of Infection: Exports And Hiv Incidence In Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 10(5), pages 1025-1058, October.
    3. Hoyt Bleakley, 2010. "Health, Human Capital, and Development," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 2(1), pages 283-310, September.
    4. Nava Ashraf & Günther Fink & David N. Weil, 2014. "Evaluating the Effects of Large-Scale Health Interventions in Developing Countries: The Zambian Malaria Initiative," NBER Chapters, in: African Successes, Volume II: Human Capital, pages 13-57, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Hoyt Bleakley, 2009. "Comment on "When Does Improving Health Raise GDP?"," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2008, Volume 23, pages 205-220, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Douglas Gollin & Christian Zimmermann, 2005. "Malaria," 2005 Meeting Papers 561, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    7. Bleakley, Hoyt & Miguel, Edward & Kremer, Michael R. & Jukes, Matthew & Bundy, Donald A. P., 2009. "Deworming and Development: Asking the Right Questions, Asking the Questions Right," Scholarly Articles 4460861, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    8. Seema Jayachandran & Adriana Lleras-Muney, 2009. "Life Expectancy and Human Capital Investments: Evidence from Maternal Mortality Declines," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(1), pages 349-397.
    9. Chinhui Juhn & Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan & Belgi Turan, 2013. "HIV and fertility in Africa: first evidence from population-based surveys," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(3), pages 835-853, July.
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    11. Alan I. Barreca, 2010. "The Long-Term Economic Impact of In Utero and Postnatal Exposure to Malaria," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(4), pages 865-892.
    12. David Cutler & Winnie Fung & Michael Kremer & Monica Singhal & Tom Vogl, 2010. "Early-Life Malaria Exposure and Adult Outcomes: Evidence from Malaria Eradication in India," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 72-94, April.
    13. Adrienne M. Lucas, 2010. "Malaria Eradication and Educational Attainment: Evidence from Paraguay and Sri Lanka," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 46-71, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yao, Yao, 2016. "Fertility and HIV risk in Africa," Working Paper Series 5342, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.

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