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Accounting for cross-country income differences

  • Francesco Caselli
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    Why are some countries so much richer than others? Development Accounting is a first-pass attempt at organizing the answer around two proximate determinants: factors of production and efficiency. It answers the question “how much of the cross-country income variance can be attributed to differences in (physical and human) capital, and how much to differences in the efficiency with which capital is used?” Hence, it does for the cross-section what growth accounting does in the time series. The current consensus is that efficiency is at least as important as capital in explaining income differences. I survey the data and the basic methods that lead to this consensus, and explore several extensions. I argue that some of these extensions may lead to a reconsideration of the evidence.

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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/3567/
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    Paper provided by London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library in its series LSE Research Online Documents on Economics with number 3567.

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    Length: 72 pages
    Date of creation: Jan 2005
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:3567
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    Web page: http://www.lse.ac.uk/

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