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The Economic Effects of Malaria Eradication: Evidence from an Intervention in Uganda

Author

Listed:
  • Jeremy Barofsky

    () (Harvard School of Public Health)

  • Claire Chase

    (Harvard School of Public Health)

  • Tobenna Anekwe
  • Farshad Farzadfar

Abstract

This study evaluates the economic consequences of a malaria eradication campaign in the southwestern Ugandan district of Kigezi. The project was a joint venture between the WHO and Uganda's Ministry of Health, designed to test for the first time the feasibility of malaria eradication in a sub-Saharan African country. During the years of 1959 and 1960, eradication efforts employing DDT spraying and mass distribution of anti-malarials were implemented, beginning in northern Kigezi. Follow-up studies reported a drop in overall parasite rates from 22.7 to 0.5% in hyperendemic areas and from 12.5 to 0% in mesoendemic areas. We use this campaign as a plausibly exogenous health shock to explore changes in human-capital formation and income. We employ a difference-in-difference methodology to show that eradication produced differential improvements in Kigezi compare to the rest of Uganda in years of schooling, literacy, and primary school completion. In addition, we find suggestive evidence that eradication increased income levels.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeremy Barofsky & Claire Chase & Tobenna Anekwe & Farshad Farzadfar, 2011. "The Economic Effects of Malaria Eradication: Evidence from an Intervention in Uganda," PGDA Working Papers 7011, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
  • Handle: RePEc:gdm:wpaper:7011
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    File URL: http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/pgda/WorkingPapers/2011/PGDA_WP_70.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Björkman Nyqvist, Martina & Svensson, Jakob & Yanagizawa-Drott, David, 2012. "Can Good Products Drive Out Bad? Evidence from Local Markets for (Fake?) Antimalarial Medicine in Uganda," CEPR Discussion Papers 9114, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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    Keywords

    human capital; malaria; economic development and health;

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