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Malaria eradication and economic outcomes in sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Uganda

Author

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  • Barofsky, Jeremy
  • Anekwe, Tobenna D.
  • Chase, Claire

Abstract

This study evaluates the economic consequences of a 1959–1960 malaria eradication campaign in southwestern Uganda. The effort constitutes a rare, large-scale, and well-documented attempt to eliminate malaria in sub-Saharan Africa and produced an immediate disease reduction. We use this quasi-experimental health shock to identify long-term changes in educational and economic outcomes. Comparing the treatment district to a similar synthetic control, we find malaria eradication raised educational attainment by about a half year for both males and females, increased primary school completion among females and generated an almost 40% rise in the likelihood of male wage employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Barofsky, Jeremy & Anekwe, Tobenna D. & Chase, Claire, 2015. "Malaria eradication and economic outcomes in sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Uganda," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 118-136.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:44:y:2015:i:c:p:118-136
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2015.08.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Josselin Thuilliez & Hippolyte d'Albis & Hamidou Niangaly & Ogobara Doumbo, 2017. "Malaria and Education: Evidence from Mali," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 26(4), pages 443-469.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Malaria; Malaria eradication; Human capital; Economic development; Uganda;

    JEL classification:

    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure

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