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Paludisme et anémie des enfants en Afrique subsaharienne : Effet de la distribution de moustiquaires

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  • Bénédicte H. Apouey

    (PSE - Paris School of Economics, PSE - Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Gabriel Picone

    (Department of Economics - USF - University of South Florida)

  • Joshua Wilde

    (Department of Economics - USF - University of South Florida)

  • Joseph Coleman

    (Department of Economics - USF - University of South Florida)

  • Robyn Kibler

    (Department of Economics - USF - University of South Florida)

Abstract

Cet article évalue l'effet de différentes politiques de lutte contre le paludisme, et en particulier de la politique dite de « mise à l'échelle » de la distribution de moustiquaires, sur la probabilité d'anémie des enfants en Afrique subsaharienne. Les données combinent des informations individuelles sur plus de 150000 enfants et leur famille, et des informations régionales sur l'intensité du paludisme avant le lancement des campagnes, pour 16 pays, entre 2000 et 2014. La méthode utilisée est celle des différences-en-différences, qui teste si les politiques ont entraîné une baisse plus forte de l'anémie dans les régions où l'intensité du paludisme était plus élevée. Les résultats indiquent que la mise à l'échelle a un effet faible ou négligeable sur la probabilité d'anémie modérée ou sévère, tandis que les autres politiques n'ont pas d'effet significatif.

Suggested Citation

  • Bénédicte H. Apouey & Gabriel Picone & Joshua Wilde & Joseph Coleman & Robyn Kibler, 2016. "Paludisme et anémie des enfants en Afrique subsaharienne : Effet de la distribution de moustiquaires," PSE Working Papers halshs-01261988, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:psewpa:halshs-01261988
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01261988
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Denis Cogneau & Pauline Rossi, 2017. "Malaria Control and Infant Mortality in Africa," PSE Working Papers hal-01543033, HAL.
    2. repec:afe:journl:v:19:y:2017:i:2:p:19-32 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Joshua Wilde & Bénédicte H. Apouey & Gabriel Picone & Joseph Coleman, 2017. "The Effect of Antimalarial Campaigns on Child Mortality and Fertility in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 0616, University of South Florida, Department of Economics.
    4. Gabriel Picone & Robyn Kibler & Bénédicte H. Apouey, 2017. "Malaria Prevalence, Indoor Residual Spraying, and Insecticide Treated Net Usage in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of African Development, African Finance and Economic Association, vol. 19(2), pages 19-32.

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    Keywords

    Paludisme;

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