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Malaria and Education: Evidence from Mali

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This article examines the influence of malaria on human capital accumulation in the village of Diankabou in Mali. To account for malaria endogeneity and its interaction with unobservable risk factors, we exploit natural variations in malaria immunity across individuals of several sympatric ethnic groups – the Fulani and the non-Fulani – who differ in their susceptibility to malaria. The Fulani are known to be less susceptible to malaria infections, despite living with a similar malaria transmission intensity to those seen among other ethnic groups. We also use natural variation of malaria intensity in the area (during and after the malaria transmission season) and utilize this seasonal change as a treatment. We find that malaria has an impact on cognitive and educational outcomes in this village. We discuss the implications of this result for human capital investments and fertility decisions with the help of a quantity-quality model

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  • Josselin Thuilliez & Hippolyte d'Albis & Hamidou Niangaly & Ogobara Doumbo, 2016. "Malaria and Education: Evidence from Mali," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 16009, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
  • Handle: RePEc:mse:cesdoc:16009
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    File URL: ftp://mse.univ-paris1.fr/pub/mse/CES2016/16009.pdf
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    1. Thuilliez, Josselin & Sissoko, Mahamadou S. & Toure, Ousmane B. & Kamate, Paul & Berthélemy, Jean-Claude & Doumbo, Ogobara K., 2010. "Malaria and primary education in Mali: A longitudinal study in the village of Donéguébougou," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 324-334, July.
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    12. Thomas Baudin, 2012. "The Optimal Trade-Off Between Quality and Quantity with Unknown Number of Survivors," Mathematical Population Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(2), pages 94-113, April.
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    Keywords

    Malaria; Immunity; Education; Cognition; Fertility;

    JEL classification:

    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development

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