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Malaria prevalence, indoor residual spraying, and insecticide-treated net usage in Sub-Saharan Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Gabriel Picone

    (Department of Economics - USF - University of South Florida)

  • Robyn Kibler

    (Department of Economics - USF - University of South Florida)

  • Bénédicte H. Apouey

    (PSE - Paris School of Economics, PSE - Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the effect of malaria prevalence and indoor residual spraying on the probability of sleeping under an insecticide-treated bed net in nine Sub-Saharan countries. Specifically, it examines whether bed net usage is elastic with respect to malaria prevalence and whether indoor residual spraying, which is a public intervention, crowds out bed net usage, which is a private behavior. Using data on individual bed net usage and household indoor residual spraying combined with local malaria prevalence, we show that malaria prevalence has a positive effect on bed net usage, but that bed net usage is inelastic with respect to malaria prevalence, with elasticity ranging from 0.42 for adult women to 0.59 for older children, in our preferred model. We also find that indoor residual spraying does not crowd out bed net usage. Instead, individuals who live in houses that were recently sprayed are more likely to use a bed net.

Suggested Citation

  • Gabriel Picone & Robyn Kibler & Bénédicte H. Apouey, 2013. "Malaria prevalence, indoor residual spraying, and insecticide-treated net usage in Sub-Saharan Africa," PSE Working Papers halshs-00911364, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:psewpa:halshs-00911364
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00911364
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bénédicte H. Apouey & Gabriel Picone, 2014. "Social Interactions and Malaria Preventive Behaviors in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers halshs-00940084, HAL.
    2. Orkoh, Emmanuel & Annim, Samuel Kobina, 2014. "Source and Use of Insecticide Treated Net and Malaria Prevalence," MPRA Paper 60558, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 10 Dec 2014.
    3. Bénédicte Apouey & Gabriel Picone, 2014. "Social Interactions And Malaria Preventive Behaviors In Sub‐Saharan Africa," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(9), pages 994-1012, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Malaria prevalence elasticity; Indoor residual spraying; Insecticide-treated nets;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • H4 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods

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