IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hal/journl/inserm-00838508.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Malaria and protective behaviours: is there a malaria trap?

Author

Listed:
  • Jean-Claude Berthélemy

    () (CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, FERDI - Fondation pour les Etudes et Recherches sur le Développement International)

  • Josselin Thuilliez

    () (CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, FERDI - Fondation pour les Etudes et Recherches sur le Développement International)

  • Ogobara Doumbo

    () (DEAP - Département d'épidémiologie des affections parasitaires - Université de Bamako - Malaria Research and Training Center (MRTC) - Facultés de Médecine, de Pharmacie et d'Odonto-Stomatologie - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Jean Gaudart

    () (SESSTIM - U912 INSERM - Aix Marseille Univ - IRD - Sciences Economiques et Sociales de la Santé & Traitement de l'Information Médicale - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - INSERM - Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale - AMU - Aix Marseille Université)

Abstract

BackgroundIn spite of massive efforts to generalize efficient prevention, such as insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITN) or long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs), malaria remains prevalent in many countries and ITN/LLINs are still only used to a limited extent.MethodsThis study proposes a new model for malaria economic analysis by combining economic epidemiology tools with the literature on poverty traps. A theoretical model of rational protective behaviour in response to malaria is designed, which includes endogenous externalities and disease characteristics. Survey data available for Uganda provide empirical support to the theory of prevalence-elastic protection behaviours, once endogeneity issues related to epidemiology and poverty are solved.ResultsTwo important conclusions emerge from the model. First, agents increase their protective behaviour when malaria is more prevalent in a society. This is consistent with the literature on "prevalence-elastic behaviour". Second, a 'malaria trap' defined as the result of malaria reinforcing poverty while poverty reduces the ability to deal with malaria can theoretically exist and the conditions of existence of the malaria trap are identified.ConclusionsThese results suggest the possible existence of malaria traps, which provides policy implications. Notably, providing ITN/LLINs at subsidized prices is not sufficient. To be efficient an ITN/LLINs dissemination campaigns should include incentive of the very poor for using ITN/LLINs.

Suggested Citation

  • Jean-Claude Berthélemy & Josselin Thuilliez & Ogobara Doumbo & Jean Gaudart, 2013. "Malaria and protective behaviours: is there a malaria trap?," Post-Print inserm-00838508, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:inserm-00838508
    DOI: 10.1186/1475-2875-12-200
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://www.hal.inserm.fr/inserm-00838508
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.hal.inserm.fr/inserm-00838508/document
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Thuilliez, Josselin & Sissoko, Mahamadou S. & Toure, Ousmane B. & Kamate, Paul & Berthélemy, Jean-Claude & Doumbo, Ogobara K., 2010. "Malaria and primary education in Mali: A longitudinal study in the village of Donéguébougou," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 324-334, July.
    2. John Strauss & Duncan Thomas, 1998. "Health, Nutrition, and Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(2), pages 766-817, June.
    3. Robert J. Brent, 2012. "The Effects Of Hiv Medications On The Quality Of Life Of Older Adults In New York City," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(8), pages 967-976, August.
    4. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2010. "Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262232588, September.
    5. Layard, R. & Mayraz, G. & Nickell, S., 2008. "The marginal utility of income," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(8-9), pages 1846-1857, August.
    6. Douglas Gollin & Christian Zimmermann, 2007. "Malaria: Disease Impacts and Long-Run Income Differences," Working papers 2007-30, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2010.
    7. Thuilliez, Josselin, 2010. "Fever, malaria and primary repetition rates amongst school children in Mali: Combining demographic and health surveys (DHS) with spatial malariological measures," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 314-323, July.
    8. Jacky MATHONNAT & Jean-François BRUN & Martine AUDIBERT & Marie-Claire HENRY, 2006. "Malaria, Production and Income of the Producers of Coffee and Cocoa: an Analysis from Survey Data in Côte d’Ivoire. Malaria, coffee and cocoa production and income," Working Papers 200631, CERDI.
    9. Hoyt Bleakley, 2010. "Malaria Eradication in the Americas: A Retrospective Analysis of Childhood Exposure," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 1-45, April.
    10. R. C. Geary, 1950. "A Note on "A Constant-Utility Index of the Cost of Living"," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(1), pages 65-66.
    11. L. R. Klein & H. Rubin, 1947. "A Constant-Utility Index of the Cost of Living," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(2), pages 84-87.
    12. Awash Teklehaimanot & Gordon C. McCord & Jeffrey D. Sachs, 2007. "Scaling Up Malaria Control in Africa: An Economic and Epidemiological Assessment," NBER Working Papers 13664, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Chima, Reginald Ikechukwu & Goodman, Catherine A. & Mills, Anne, 2003. "The economic impact of malaria in Africa: a critical review of the evidence," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 17-36, January.
    14. Momota, Akira & Tabata, Ken & Futagami, Koichi, 2005. "Infectious disease and preventive behavior in an overlapping generations model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 29(10), pages 1673-1700, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Jean-Claude Berthélemy & Josselin Thuilliez, 2014. "The Economics of Malaria in Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2014-047, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Jean-Claude Berthélemy & Victor Doubliez & Josselin Thuilliez, 2015. "Prevention or treatment? The introduction of a new antimalarial drug in Angola," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01244406, HAL.
    3. Saurabh Singhal & Yao Pan, 2015. "Income and Malaria: Evidence from an agricultural intervention in Uganda," WIDER Working Paper Series 092, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Eric Maskin & Célestin Monga & Josselin Thuilliez & Jean-Claude Berthélemy, 2019. "The economics of malaria control in an age of declining aid," Post-Print hal-02153101, HAL.
    5. Berthélemy, Jean-Claude & Gaudart, Jean & Thuilliez, Josselin, 2015. "Prevention or treatment? The case of malaria," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 16-19.
    6. Yao Pan & Saurabh Singhal, 2015. "Income and malaria: Evidence from an agricultural intervention in Uganda," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2015-092, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Gabriel Picone & Robyn Kibler & Bénédicte H. Apouey, 2017. "Malaria Prevalence, Indoor Residual Spraying, and Insecticide Treated Net Usage in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of African Development, African Finance and Economic Association (AFEA), vol. 19(2), pages 19-32.
    8. Pan, Yao & Singhal, Saurabh, 2019. "Agricultural extension, intra-household allocation and malaria," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 139(C), pages 157-170.
    9. Jean-Claude Berthelemy & Josselin Thuilliez, 2014. "The economics of malaria in Africa," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01045213, HAL.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Maria Kuecken & Josselin Thuilliez & Marie-Anne Valfort, 2013. "Does malaria control impact education? A study of the Global Fund in Africa," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 13075, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    2. Jean-Claude Berthélemy & Josselin Thuilliez, 2014. "The economics of malaria in Africa," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01045213, HAL.
    3. Jean-Claude Berthelemy & Josselin Thuilliez, 2014. "The economics of malaria in Africa," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01045213, HAL.
    4. Marcello Basili & Filippo Belloc, 2015. "How To Measure The Economic Impact Of Vector-Borne Diseases At Country Level," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(5), pages 896-916, December.
    5. Bloom, David E. & Kuhn, Michael & Prettner, Klaus, 2020. "Modern Infectious Diseases: Macroeconomic Impacts and Policy Responses," IZA Discussion Papers 13625, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Maria Kuecken & Josselin Thuilliez & Marie-Anne Valfort, 2013. "Large-scale health interventions and education: Evidence from Roll Back Malaria in Africa," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 13075r, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne, revised Jun 2015.
    7. Shufang Zhang & Marcia C. Castro & David Canning, 2011. "The Effect of Malaria on Settlement and Land Use: Evidence from the Brazilian Amazon," PGDA Working Papers 7711, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
    8. Jonathan Colmer, 2013. "Climate Variability, Child Labour and Schooling: Evidence on the Intensive and Extensive Margin," GRI Working Papers 132, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    9. Dillon, Andrew & Friedman, Jed & Serneels, Pieter, 2014. "Health Information, Treatment, and Worker Productivity: Experimental Evidence from Malaria Testing and Treatment among Nigerian Sugarcane Cutters," IZA Discussion Papers 8074, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    10. Stefan Baumgärtner & Moritz A. Drupp & Martin F. Quaas, 2017. "Subsistence, Substitutability and Sustainability in Consumption," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 67(1), pages 47-66, May.
    11. David E Bloom & Michael Kuhn & Klaus Prettner, 2020. "The contribution of female health to economic development [The costs of missing the Millennium Development Goal on gender equity]," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 130(630), pages 1650-1677.
    12. Gutierrez, Federico H., 2014. "Acute morbidity and labor outcomes in Mexico: Testing the role of labor contracts as an income smoothing mechanism," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 1-12.
    13. Martin Berlin & Niklas Kaunitz, 2015. "Beyond Income: The Importance for Life Satisfaction of Having Access to a Cash Margin," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 16(6), pages 1557-1573, December.
    14. Nguyen, Ha & Duncan, Alan, 2015. "Macroeconomic fluctuations in home countries and immigrants’ well-being: New evidence from Down Under," MPRA Paper 69593, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Feb 2016.
    15. Maria Kuecken & Josselin Thuilliez & Marie-Anne Valfort, 2015. "Does malaria control impact education? Evidence from Roll Back Malaria in Africa," PSE - Labex "OSE-Ouvrir la Science Economique" halshs-01099524, HAL.
    16. Kaiser, Caspar, 2018. "People do not adapt to income changes: A re-evaluation of the dynamic effects of (reference) income on life satisfaction with GSOEP and UKHLS data," MPRA Paper 89867, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. McNamara, Paul E. & Ulimwengu, John M. & Leonard, Kenneth L., 2010. "Do health investments improve agricultural productivity? Lessons from agricultural household and health research," IFPRI discussion papers 1012, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    18. Kyriakos C. Neanidis & Stephen M. Miller, 2012. "Demographic Transition and Economic Welfare: The Role of Humanitarian Aid," Working Papers 1201, University of Nevada, Las Vegas , Department of Economics.
    19. Wang, Qing & Zhang, Shiying, 2020. "Gender Inequality in Nutrition Intake: Evidence from a Large Assistance Program," GLO Discussion Paper Series 740, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    20. Tianxin Pan & Michael Palmer & Ajay Mahal & Peter Annear & Barbara McPake, 2020. "The long‐run effects of noncommunicable disease shocks," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(12), pages 1549-1565, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Protective behaviours; Poverty; Economic epidemiology; Malaria; ITN;
    All these keywords.

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hal:journl:inserm-00838508. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (CCSD). General contact details of provider: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.