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The economic impact of malaria in Africa: a critical review of the evidence


  • Chima, Reginald Ikechukwu
  • Goodman, Catherine A.
  • Mills, Anne


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  • Chima, Reginald Ikechukwu & Goodman, Catherine A. & Mills, Anne, 2003. "The economic impact of malaria in Africa: a critical review of the evidence," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 17-36, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:63:y:2003:i:1:p:17-36

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jayawardene, Ruwani, 1993. "Illness perception: Social cost and coping-strategies of malaria cases," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 1169-1176, November.
    2. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    3. Asenso-Okyere, W. K. & Dzator, Janet A., 1997. "Household cost of seeking malaria care. A retrospective study of two districts in Ghana," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 45(5), pages 659-667, September.
    4. Bonilla, Elssy & Rodriguez, A., 1993. "Determining malaria effects in rural Colombia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 1109-1114, November.
    5. Boissiere, M & Knight, J B & Sabot, R H, 1985. "Earnings, Schooling, Ability, and Cognitive Skills," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(5), pages 1016-1030, December.
    6. Mwenesi, Halima & Harpham, Trudy & Snow, Robert W., 1995. "Child malaria treatment practices among mothers in Kenya," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 40(9), pages 1271-1277, May.
    7. Koopmanschap, Marc A. & Rutten, Frans F. H. & van Ineveld, B. Martin & van Roijen, Leona, 1995. "The friction cost method for measuring indirect costs of disease," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 171-189, June.
    8. Wang'Ombe, Joseph K. & Mwabu, Germano M., 1993. "Agricultural land use patterns and malaria conditions in Kenya," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 1121-1130, November.
    9. Brown, Peter J., 1986. "Socioeconomic and demographic effects of malaria eradication: A comparison of Sri Lanka and Sardinia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 22(8), pages 847-859, January.
    10. Popkin, Barry M., 1982. "A household framework for examining the social and economic consequences of tropical diseases," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 533-543, January.
    11. Audibert, Martine, 1986. "Agricultural non-wage production and health status : A case study in a tropical environment," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 275-291, December.
    12. Winch, P. J. & Makemba, A. M. & Kamazima, S. R. & Lurie, M. & Lwihula, G. K. & Premji, Z. & Minjas, J. N. & Shiff, C. J., 1996. "Local terminology for febrile illnesses in Bagamoyo District, Tanzania and its impact on the design of a community-based malaria control programme," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 42(7), pages 1057-1067, April.
    13. David B. Evans & Susan F. Hurley, 1995. "The application of economic evaluation techniques in the health sector: The state of the art," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(3), pages 503-524, May.
    14. Sauerborn, R. & Adams, A. & Hien, M., 1996. "Household strategies to cope with the economic costs of illness," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 291-301, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Randall M. Packard, 2009. ""Roll Back Malaria, Roll in Development"? Reassessing the Economic Burden of Malaria," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 35(1), pages 53-87.
    2. De Alwis, Diana & Noy, Ilan, 2017. "The cost of being under the weather: Droughts, floods, and health care costs in Sri Lanka," Working Paper Series 6397, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    3. Raouf Boucekkine & Rodolphe Desbordes & Hélène Latzer, 2009. "How do epidemics induce behavioral changes?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 233-264, September.
    4. Cervellati, Matteo & Esposito, Elena & Sunde, Uwe & Valmori, Simona, 2016. "Malaria Risk and Civil Violence," CEPR Discussion Papers 11496, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Jean-Claude Berthelemy & Josselin Thuilliez, 2014. "The economics of malaria in Africa," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01045213, HAL.
    6. Bosello, Francesco & Roson, Roberto & Tol, Richard S.J., 2006. "Economy-wide estimates of the implications of climate change: Human health," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 579-591, June.
    7. Asenso-Okyere, Kwadwo & Asante, Felix A. & Tarekegn, Jifar & Andam, Kwaw S., 2009. "The linkages between agriculture and malaria: Issues for policy, research, and capacity strengthening," IFPRI discussion papers 861, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Ikefuji, M. & Magnus, J.R. & Sakamoto, H., 2010. "Climate Change, Economic Growth, and Health," Discussion Paper 2010-86, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    9. Douglas Gollin & Christian Zimmermann, 2005. "Malaria," 2005 Meeting Papers 561, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    10. Andrew Dillon & Jed Friedman & Pieter Serneels, 2014. "Health information, treatment, and worker productivity: Experimental evidence from malaria testing and treatment among Nigerian sugarcane cutters," Working Paper series, University of East Anglia, Centre for Behavioural and Experimental Social Science (CBESS) 14-05, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
    11. Laxminarayan, Ramanan, 2003. "ACT Now or Later: The Economics of Malaria Resistance," Discussion Papers dp-03-51, Resources For the Future.
    12. McIntyre, Diane & Thiede, Michael & Dahlgren, Göran & Whitehead, Margaret, 2006. "What are the economic consequences for households of illness and of paying for health care in low- and middle-income country contexts?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(4), pages 858-865, February.
    13. Pavel, Md Sadik & Chakrabarty, Sayan & Gow, Jeff, 2015. "Cost of illness for outpatients attending public and private hospitals in Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 74491, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 03 Sep 2016.
    14. John Horowitz, 2009. "The Income–Temperature Relationship in a Cross-Section of Countries and its Implications for Predicting the Effects of Global Warming," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 44(4), pages 475-493, December.
    15. Edgeworth, Ross & Collins, Andrew E., 2006. "Self-care as a response to diarrhoea in rural Bangladesh: Empowered choice or enforced adoption?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(10), pages 2686-2697, November.
    16. repec:spr:pharmo:v:1:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s41669-017-0021-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Wielgosz, Benjamin & Mangheni, Margaret Najjingo & Tsegai, Daniel & Ringler, Claudia, 2012. "Malaria and agriculture: A global review of the literature with a focus on the application of integrated pest and vector management in East Africa and Uganda," IFPRI discussion papers 1232, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    18. Laxminarayan, Ramanan & Parry, Ian W.H. & Smith, David L. & Klein, Eili Y., 2010. "Should new antimalarial drugs be subsidized?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 445-456, May.
    19. Su, Tin Tin & Sanon, Mamadou & Flessa, Steffen, 2007. "Assessment of indirect cost-of-illness in a subsistence farming society by using different valuation methods," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 83(2-3), pages 353-362, October.
    20. Jean-Claude Berthelemy & Josselin Thuilliez & Ogobara Doumbo & Jean Gaudart, 2013. "Malaria and protective behaviours: is there a malaria trap?," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) inserm-00838508, HAL.
    21. Masha F. Somi & James R. G. Butler & Farshid Vahid & Joseph D. Njau & Salim Abdulla, 2009. "Household responses to health risks and shocks: A study from rural Tanzania raises some methodological issues," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(2), pages 200-211.
    22. Shufang Zhang & Marcia C. Castro & David Canning, 2011. "The Effect of Malaria on Settlement and Land Use: Evidence from the Brazilian Amazon," PGDA Working Papers 7711, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
    23. Marcello Basili & Filippo Belloc, 2012. "How to Measure the Economic Impact of Vector-Borne Diseases at a Country Level: An Assessment," Department of Economics University of Siena 648, Department of Economics, University of Siena.

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