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Malaria and Primary Education: A cross-country analysis on primary repetition and completion rates

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Abstract

This paper explores the link between P. Falciparum malaria - most of malaria morbidity and mortality is due to the malignant Plasmodium Falciparum - and primary education in terms of school performances at the macroeconomic stage. Cross-country regression analysis shows that the relation between school results (measured by repetition and completion rates) and the P. Falciparum malaria index is strong. The results implies that the achievement of the education Millennium Development Goals will require more than just focusing on expenditure in primary education. It does not imply that resources in education are unnecessary but that increasing resources in education and improving education resources management alone are unlikely to be sufficient. This paper suggests that health conditions and especially diseases that alter cognitive capacities of children such as malaria should be taken into account much more seriously. This study also sees the need to place emphasis on research that will improve the quality of interventions to prevent malaria. Specific education expenditure to face Malaria should be examined in addition to health policies

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  • Josselin Thuilliez, 2007. "Malaria and Primary Education: A cross-country analysis on primary repetition and completion rates," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne bla07013, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
  • Handle: RePEc:mse:cesdoc:bla07013
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    1. Maria Kuecken & Josselin Thuilliez & Marie-Anne Valfort, 2013. "Does malaria control impact education? A study of the Global Fund in Africa," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 13075, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    2. Maria Kuecken & Josselin Thuilliez & Marie-Anne Valfort, 2013. "Large-scale health interventions and education: Evidence from Roll Back Malaria in Africa," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 13075r, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne, revised Jun 2015.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Malaria incidence; human capital; development;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General

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