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Fever, malaria and primary repetition rates amongst school children in Mali: Combining demographic and health surveys (DHS) with spatial malariological measures

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  • Thuilliez, Josselin

Abstract

This study estimates the relative importance to child school performance (indicated by primary repetition) of fever, malaria and some social determinants at the cluster level. It uses individual, household and cluster surveys from the Demographic and Health Surveys conducted in Mali in 2001 and 2006 (MDHS). It also provides a discussion about the use of fever as an indicator of malaria in large cross-sectional surveys by comparing the 2001 and 2006 MDHS, which were realised during two different transmission seasons (dry and rainy seasons). Geographic Information System and DHS Global Positioning System datasets were used to extract age-specific malariological measures from reliable maps of the prevalence and transmission intensity of malaria. We show that fever is not a reliable proxy for malaria at the cluster level, and we recommend the use of spatial measures of malaria prevalence for future research. Cross-sectional regression analysis on data aggregated to the group-level suggests that a higher prevalence of malaria in a community is linked to higher primary repetition rates, but confirmatory studies are needed.

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  • Thuilliez, Josselin, 2010. "Fever, malaria and primary repetition rates amongst school children in Mali: Combining demographic and health surveys (DHS) with spatial malariological measures," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 314-323, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:71:y:2010:i:2:p:314-323
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    1. John Strauss & Duncan Thomas, 1998. "Health, Nutrition, and Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(2), pages 766-817, June.
    2. Samer Al-Samarrai, 2006. "Achieving education for all: how much does money matter?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(2), pages 179-206.
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    4. Josselin Thuilliez, 2009. "L'impact du paludisme sur l'éducation primaire : une analyse en coupe transversale des taux de redoublement et d'achèvement," Revue d’économie du développement, De Boeck Université, vol. 17(1), pages 167-201.
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    6. Boyle, Michael H. & Racine, Yvonne & Georgiades, Katholiki & Snelling, Dana & Hong, Sungjin & Omariba, Walter & Hurley, Patricia & Rao-Melacini, Purnima, 2006. "The influence of economic development level, household wealth and maternal education on child health in the developing world," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(8), pages 2242-2254, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jean-Claude Berthelemy & Josselin Thuilliez, 2014. "The economics of malaria in Africa," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01045213, HAL.
    2. Maria Kuecken & Josselin Thuilliez & Marie-Anne Valfort, 2014. "Does malaria control impact education? A study of the Global Fund in Africa," Working Papers halshs-00924112, HAL.
    3. Maria Kuecken & Josselin Thuilliez & Marie-Anne Valfort, 2013. "Large-scale health interventions and education: Evidence from Roll Back Malaria in Africa," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 13075r, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne, revised Jun 2015.
    4. Maria Kuecken & Josselin Thuilliez & Marie-Anne Valfort, 2013. "Does malaria control impact education? A study of the Global Fund in Africa," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 13075, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    5. Jean-Claude Berthelemy & Josselin Thuilliez & Ogobara Doumbo & Jean Gaudart, 2013. "Malaria and protective behaviours: is there a malaria trap?," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) inserm-00838508, HAL.

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