IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The Effect of Malaria on Settlement and Land Use: Evidence from the Brazilian Amazon

  • Shufang Zhang


  • Marcia C. Castro


    (Harvard School of Public Health)

  • David Canning


    (Harvard School of Public Health)

We estimate the effect of malaria on settlement and land use patterns in the Brazilian Amazon, where potential settlers were randomly assigned to plots in a newly opened settlement area. The random assignment allows us to estimate the risk of malaria on each plot based only on its characteristics. Using survey data, we find that a high malaria risk significantly reduces the probability that a plot is inhabited. Using satellite images, we find that a high malaria risk does not reduce forest clearance or crop coverage on a plot. Non-resident farming substitutes for physical inhabitation when malaria risk is high.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Our checks indicate that this address may not be valid because: 404 Not Found. If this is indeed the case, please notify (Günther Fink)

Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Program on the Global Demography of Aging in its series PGDA Working Papers with number 7711.

in new window

Date of creation: Nov 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:gdm:wpaper:7711
Contact details of provider: Web page:

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Douglas Gollin & Christian Zimmermann, 2007. "Malaria: Disease Impacts and Long-Run Income Differences," Working papers 2007-30, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2010.
  2. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
  3. Fernandez Castilla, Rogelio E. & Sawyer, Diana Oya, 1993. "Malaria rates and fate: A socioeconomic study of malaria in Brazil," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 1137-1145, November.
  4. Wang'Ombe, Joseph K. & Mwabu, Germano M., 1993. "Agricultural land use patterns and malaria conditions in Kenya," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 1121-1130, November.
  5. Chima, Reginald Ikechukwu & Goodman, Catherine A. & Mills, Anne, 2003. "The economic impact of malaria in Africa: a critical review of the evidence," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 17-36, January.
  6. Nur, El Tahir Mohamed, 1993. "The impact of malaria on labour use and efficiency in the Sudan," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 1115-1119, November.
  7. Laxminarayan, Ramanan, 2003. "Does Reducing Malaria Improve Household Living Standards?," Discussion Papers dp-03-50, Resources For the Future.
  8. David Cutler & Winnie Fung & Michael Kremer & Monica Singhal & Tom Vogl, 2010. "Early-Life Malaria Exposure and Adult Outcomes: Evidence from Malaria Eradication in India," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 72-94, April.
  9. Adrienne M. Lucas, 2010. "Malaria Eradication and Educational Attainment: Evidence from Paraguay and Sri Lanka," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 46-71, April.
  10. Sawyer, Donald, 1993. "Economic and social consequences of malaria in new colonization projects in Brazil," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 1131-1136, November.
  11. Hoyt Bleakley, 2010. "Malaria Eradication in the Americas: A Retrospective Analysis of Childhood Exposure," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 1-45, April.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:gdm:wpaper:7711. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Günther Fink)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.