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Does Reducing Malaria Improve Household Living Standards?

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  • Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    () (Resources for the Future)

Abstract

Living in malaria-endemic regions places an economic burden on households even if they do not actually suffer an episode of malaria. Households living with endemic malaria are less likely to have access to economic opportunities and may have to modify agricultural practices and other household behavior to adapt to their disease environment. Data from Vietnam demonstrate that reductions in malaria incidence through government-financed malaria control programs can contribute to higher household income for all households living in endemic areas. Empirically, a 10% decrease in malaria cases at the national level translates to a roughly US$30 million annual economic benefit in the form of improved living standards.

Suggested Citation

  • Laxminarayan, Ramanan, 2003. "Does Reducing Malaria Improve Household Living Standards?," Discussion Papers dp-03-50, Resources For the Future.
  • Handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-03-50
    as

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    File URL: http://www.rff.org/RFF/documents/RFF-DP-03-50.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Ebaidalla Mahjoub Ebaidalla & Mohammed Elhaj Mustafa Ali, 2017. "Determinants and Impact of Households’s Out-of-Pocket Health Care Expenditure in Sudan: Evidence From Urban and Rural Population," Working Papers 1170, Economic Research Forum, revised 12 2017.
    2. Gong, Liutang & Li, Hongyi & Wang, Dihai, 2012. "Health investment, physical capital accumulation, and economic growth," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 1104-1119.
    3. Liutang Gong & Hongyi Li & Dihai Wang & Heng-fu Zou, 2010. "Health, Taxes, and Growth," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 11(1), pages 73-94, May.
    4. World Bank, 2005. "Rolling Back Malaria : The World Bank Global Strategy and Booster Program," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7504, June.
    5. Dihai Wang & Heng-fu Zou, 2011. "The Fogel Approach to Health and Growth," CEMA Working Papers 520, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
    6. Shufang Zhang & Marcia C. Castro & David Canning, 2011. "The Effect of Malaria on Settlement and Land Use: Evidence from the Brazilian Amazon," PGDA Working Papers 7711, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Malaria; Living standards; Disease;

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • I0 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General

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