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The Growth Costs of Malaria

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  • Desmond McCarthy
  • Holger Wolf
  • Yi Wu

Abstract

Malaria ranks among the foremost health issues facing tropical countries. In this paper, we explore the determinants of cross-country differences in malaria morbidity, and examine the linkage between malaria and economic growth. Using a classification rule analysis, we confirm the dominant role of climate in accounting for cross-country differences in malaria morbidity. The data, however, do not suggest that tropical location is destiny: controlling for climate, we find that access to rural healthcare and income equality influence malaria morbidity. In a cross-section growth framework, we find a significant negative association between higher malaria morbidity and the growth rate of GDP per capita which is robust to a number of modifications, including controlling for reverse causation. The estimated absolute growth impact of malaria differs sharply across countries; it exceeds a quarter percent per annum in a quarter of the sample countries. Most of these are located in Sub-Saharan Africa (with an estimated average annual growth reduction of 0.55 percent).

Suggested Citation

  • Desmond McCarthy & Holger Wolf & Yi Wu, 2000. "The Growth Costs of Malaria," NBER Working Papers 7541, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:7541
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Irwin, Douglas A. & Tervio, Marko, 2002. "Does trade raise income?: Evidence from the twentieth century," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 1-18, October.
    2. Gerardo Esquivel, 2000. "Geografía y desarrollo económico en México," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 2049, Inter-American Development Bank.
    3. Asenso-Okyere, Kwadwo & Asante, Felix A. & Tarekegn, Jifar & Andam, Kwaw S., 2009. "The linkages between agriculture and malaria: Issues for policy, research, and capacity strengthening," IFPRI discussion papers 861, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. John Ssozi & Simplice A. Asongu, 2016. "The Comparative Economics of Catch-up in Output per Worker, Total Factor Productivity and Technological Gain in Sub-Saharan Africa," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 28(2), pages 215-228, June.
    5. Clemens, Michael A. & Kenny, Charles J. & Moss, Todd J., 2007. "The Trouble with the MDGs: Confronting Expectations of Aid and Development Success," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 735-751, May.
    6. Matthew Cole & Eric Neumayer, 2006. "The impact of poor health on total factor productivity," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(6), pages 918-938.
    7. Gerardo Esquivel, 2000. "Geography and Economic Development in Mexico," Research Department Publications 3089, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    8. Strulik, Holger, 2008. "Degrees of Development - How Geographic Latitude Sets the Pace of Industrialization and Demographic Change," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-384, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    9. Huang, Rui & Fulginiti, Lilyan E. & Peterson, E. Wesley F., 2003. "Investing in Hope: AIDS, Life Expectancy, and Human Capital Accumulation," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa 25808, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    10. Marcello Basili & Filippo Belloc, 2015. "How To Measure The Economic Impact Of Vector-Borne Diseases At Country Level," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(5), pages 896-916, December.
    11. Larochelle, Catherine & Dalton, Timothy J., 2006. "Transient Health Shocks and Agricultural Labor Demand in Rice-producing Households in Mali," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25314, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    12. Rui Huang & Lilyan E. Fulginiti & E. Wesley F. Peterson, 2010. "Health and growth: causality through education," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 2(3), pages 321-344, September.
    13. Mosunmola Grace Moses Udoudo & Gabriel Sunday Umoh & Aniekan Jim Akpaeti, 2016. "Malaria and Agricultural Production in Nigeria," Asian Development Policy Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 4(4), pages 91-99, December.
    14. José García-Montalvo & Marta Reynal-Querol, 2002. "Fighting Against Malaria: Prevent Wars While Waiting For The "Miraculous" Vaccine," Working Papers. Serie EC 2002-31, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    15. Ochi, John & Madaki, Musa & Murtala, Nasiru, 2015. "Economic and Social Linkages Between Malaria Illness and Crop Production in Yobe State, Nigeria," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212587, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    16. Chris Papageorgiou & Shankha Chakraborty, 2005. "Diseases and Development," Departmental Working Papers 2005-12, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University.
    17. Wako, Hassen, 2011. "Effectiveness of foreign aid in sub-Saharan Africa: Does disaggregating aid into bilateral and multilateral components make a difference?," MPRA Paper 72617, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Marcello Basili & Filippo Belloc, 2012. "How to Measure the Economic Impact of Vector-Borne Diseases at a Country Level: An Assessment," Department of Economics University of Siena 648, Department of Economics, University of Siena.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General

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