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Geografía y desarrollo económico en México

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  • Gerardo Esquivel

Abstract

Este trabajo analiza el papel de las características geográficas en la explicación del patrón de desarrollo económico regional en México. Los resultados obtenidos demuestran que algunas variables geográficas, como el clima y la vegetación, explican una parte importante de las diferencias que existen tanto en el nivel como en la tasa de crecimiento del ingreso per capita entre los estados mexicanos. Un análisis simple de los determinantes de la esperanza de vida y de la escolaridad promedio demuestra que los aspectos geográficos también juegan un papel importante en la explicación de los diferenciales inter-estatales de estas variables en México. Estos resultados sugieren que una posible influencia de la geografía en el desarrollo económico regional se da a través de su efecto en el capital humano. Finalmente, este trabajo examina la contribución de las variables geográficas a la desigualdad regional en México. Los resultados de este ejercicio demuestran que los factores geográficos son los que más han contribuido a la desigualdad regional en México.

Suggested Citation

  • Gerardo Esquivel, 2000. "Geografía y desarrollo económico en México," Research Department Publications 3090, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:3090
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Luisa Decuir-Viruez, 2003. "Institutional Factors in the Economic growth of Mexico," ERSA conference papers ersa03p264, European Regional Science Association.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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