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Human Capital and Economic Growth in OECD Countries

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  • Middendorf Torge

    () (Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Hohenzollernstraße 1-3, D-45128 Essen, Germany)

Abstract

Recent studies on international student performance renewed the interest in the contribution of human capital to economic growth. So far the exploration of large country comparisons delivered rather mixed results. Concentrating on OECD member countries, this paper uses panel data estimation techniques to refine this analysis. Furthermore, as theory differs about the right measure of human capital, the impact of the human capital stock as well as its rate of accumulation on economic growth is analyzed. Yet estimation results reveal only a positive impact of the human capital stock on economic growth suggesting that an increase in average schooling years by one year yields a rise in the GDP growth rate of about 0.5 percentage points. However, when taking possible endogeneity into account in an instrumental variables approach, these conclusions on the impact of the level of human capital on economic growth is demonstrated to be rather fragile.

Suggested Citation

  • Middendorf Torge, 2006. "Human Capital and Economic Growth in OECD Countries," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 226(6), pages 670-686, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:jns:jbstat:v:226:y:2006:i:6:p:670-686
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    Cited by:

    1. Mihut Ioana & Luțas Mihaela, 2014. "Sustainable Growth: Recent Trends Across Central And Eastern European Economies," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(1), pages 175-186, July.
    2. Muhammad Shahid & Amjad Ali, 2015. "The Impact of Decentralized Economic Affairs Expenditures on Economic Growth: A Time Series Analysis of Pakistan," Bulletin of Business and Economics (BBE), Research Foundation for Humanity (RFH), vol. 4(3), pages 136-148, September.
    3. Arvanitis, Spyros & Loukis, Euripidis N., 2009. "Information and communication technologies, human capital, workplace organization and labour productivity: A comparative study based on firm-level data for Greece and Switzerland," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 43-61, February.
    4. repec:spr:infosf:v:14:y:2012:i:2:d:10.1007_s10796-010-9276-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Torge Middendorf, 2008. "Returns to Education in Europe – Detailed Results from a Harmonized Survey," Ruhr Economic Papers 0065, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    6. Middendorf, Torge, 2008. "Returns to Education in Europe – Detailed Results from a Harmonized Survey," Ruhr Economic Papers 65, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    7. Kevin Pugh & Gigi Foster, 2014. "Australia's National School Data and the ‘Big Data’ Revolution in Education Economics," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 47(2), pages 258-268, June.
    8. repec:zbw:rwirep:0065 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Nikos Benos & Stelios Karagiannis, 2010. "The Role of Human Capital in Economic Growth: Evidence from Greek Regions," Chapters,in: Institutional and Social Dynamics of Growth and Distribution, chapter 7 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. Valerien O. Pede & Raymond J.G.M. Florax & Henri L.F. de Groot, 2011. "Technological Leadership and Sectoral Employment Growth:A Spatial Econometric Analysis for U.S. Counties," Working Papers 11-1, Purdue University, College of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Economics.
    11. Marinko Škare & Sabina Lacmanovic, 2015. "Human capital and economic growth: a review essay," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 17(39), pages 735-735, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Human capital accumulation; convergence; fixed-effects estimation; instrumental variable estimation;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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