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Australia's National School Data and the ‘Big Data’ Revolution in Education Economics

Listed author(s):
  • Kevin Pugh
  • Gigi Foster

type="main" xml:lang="en"> The increasing availability of large-N datasets on students, schools and student achievement has produced an explosion of research in education economics over the past 20 years. In this data survey, we first review the micro-level education datasets presently available around the world, focusing on their strengths and data access protocols, and we highlight samples of research by economists that have drawn upon them. We then discuss Australia's forays into ‘Big Data’ in education, with our main objective a description and assessment of the national school data recently made available to researchers through the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority.

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Article provided by The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research in its journal Australian Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 47 (2014)
Issue (Month): 2 (06)
Pages: 258-268

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Handle: RePEc:bla:ausecr:v:47:y:2014:i:2:p:258-268
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  1. Stinebrickner, Ralph & Stinebrickner, Todd R., 2006. "What can be learned about peer effects using college roommates? Evidence from new survey data and students from disadvantaged backgrounds," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(8-9), pages 1435-1454, September.
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  3. James Heckman, 2011. "Policies to foster human capital," Educational Studies, Higher School of Economics, issue 3, pages 73-137.
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  8. Rockoff, Jonah E. & Speroni, Cecilia, 2011. "Subjective and objective evaluations of teacher effectiveness: Evidence from New York City," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 687-696, October.
  9. Brendan Houng & Moshe Justman, 2013. "Comparing Least-Squares Value-Added Analysis and Student Growth Percentile Analysis for Evaluating Student Progress and Estimating School Effects," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2013n07, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  10. Clotfelter, Charles T. & Ladd, Helen F. & Vigdor, Jacob L., 2007. "Teacher credentials and student achievement: Longitudinal analysis with student fixed effects," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 673-682, December.
  11. Caroline M. Hoxby & Sonali Murarka, 2009. "Charter Schools in New York City: Who Enrolls and How They Affect Their Students' Achievement," NBER Working Papers 14852, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  13. Rebecca Allen, 2013. "Measuring foundation school effectiveness using English administrative data, survey data and a regression discontinuity design," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(5), pages 431-446, December.
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  16. Middendorf Torge, 2006. "Human Capital and Economic Growth in OECD Countries," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 226(6), pages 670-686, December.
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