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Market Power and Price Discrimination in the U.S. Market for Higher Education

Author

Listed:
  • Dennis Epple
  • Richard Romano
  • Sinan Sarpça
  • Holger Sieg
  • Melanie Zaber

Abstract

The main purpose of this paper is to estimate an equilibrium model of private and public school competition that can generate realistic pricing patterns for private universities in the U.S. We show that the parameters of the model are identified and can be estimated using a semi-parametric estimator given data from the NPSAS. We find substantial price discrimination within colleges. We estimate that a $10,000 increase in family income increases tuition at private schools by on average $210 to $510. A one standard deviation increase in ability decreases tuition by approximately $920 to $1,960 depending on the selectivity of the college. Discounts for minority students range between $110 and $5,750.

Suggested Citation

  • Dennis Epple & Richard Romano & Sinan Sarpça & Holger Sieg & Melanie Zaber, 2017. "Market Power and Price Discrimination in the U.S. Market for Higher Education," NBER Working Papers 23360, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23360 Note: CH ED PE
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Holger Sieg & Yu Wang, 2017. "The Impact of Student Debt on Education, Career, and Marriage Choices of Female Lawyers," NBER Working Papers 23453, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • L3 - Industrial Organization - - Nonprofit Organizations and Public Enterprise

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