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PISA and the Transition into the Labour Market

Author

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  • Kathrin Bertschy
  • M. Alejandra Cattaneo
  • Stefan C. Wolter

Abstract

This paper uses unique Swiss longitudinal data that include information on Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2000 scores and the pathways chosen after completing compulsory school. Descriptive results show that students in vocational training, who obtained lower PISA results, are significantly more likely to be in an inadequate employment situation 2 years after finishing vocational training. Further analysis shows, however, that it is the type of vocational training pursued at upper secondary level that is decisive for a successful transition. Nevertheless, individual PISA scores have an indirect impact on the transition results, as they are an important factor explaining which pupils are more likely to get into an intellectually demanding vocational training and which ones are not. Copyright 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation 2009 CEIS, Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishing Ltd..

Suggested Citation

  • Kathrin Bertschy & M. Alejandra Cattaneo & Stefan C. Wolter, 2009. "PISA and the Transition into the Labour Market," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 23(s1), pages 111-137, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:23:y:2009:i:s1:p:111-137
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    Cited by:

    1. Barbara Mueller & Stefan Wolter, 2014. "The role of hard-to-obtain information on ability for the school-to-work transition," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 46(4), pages 1447-1471, June.
    2. Hou, Feng & Picot, Garnett, 2013. "Why Immigrant Background Matters for University Participation: A Comparison of Switzerland and Canada," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2013-50, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 22 Nov 2013.
    3. Hanushek, Eric A. & Woessmann, Ludger, 2011. "The Economics of International Differences in Educational Achievement," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
    4. Barbara Mueller & Stefan C. Wolter, 2011. "The Consequences of Being Different - Statistical Discrimination and the School-to-Work Transition," CESifo Working Paper Series 3345, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Daniel Horn, 2014. "The Effectiveness of Apprenticeship Training - a within track comparison of workplace-based and school-based vocational training in Hungary," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 1405, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    6. Ricardo Martínez & Antonio Villar, 2018. "Multilevel Proficiency Comparisons With An Application To Educational Outcomes In Pisa," Working Papers 18.04, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics.
    7. Jean Marc Falter & Florian Wendelspiess Chávez Juárez & Giovanni Ferro-Luzzi, 2012. "Does Tracking Shape the Intergenerational Transmission of Educational Attainment? Evidence from Switzerland," Working Papers halshs-00771941, HAL.
    8. By Barbara Mueller & Jürg Schweri, 2015. "How specific is apprenticeship training? Evidence from inter-firm and occupational mobility after graduation," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(4), pages 1057-1077.
    9. Zimmermann, Klaus F. & Biavaschi, Costanza & Eichhorst, Werner & Giulietti, Corrado & Kendzia, Michael J. & Muravyev, Alexander & Pieters, Janneke & Rodríguez-Planas, Núria & Schmidl, Ricarda, 2013. "Youth Unemployment and Vocational Training," Foundations and Trends(R) in Microeconomics, now publishers, vol. 9(1–2), pages 1-157, December.
      • Biavaschi, Costanza & Eichhorst, Werner & Giulietti, Corrado & Kendzia, Michael J. & Muravyev, Alexander & Pieters, Janneke & Rodríguez-Planas, Núria & Schmidl, Ricarda & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2012. "Youth Unemployment and Vocational Training," IZA Discussion Papers 6890, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Horn, Dániel, 2014. "A szakiskolai tanoncképzés rövid távú munkaerő-piaci hatásai
      [The short-term labour-market effects of vocational apprenticeship training]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(9), pages 975-999.
    11. Garnett Picot & Feng Hou, 2013. "Why Immigrant Background Matters for University Participation: A Comparison of Switzerland and Canada," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(3), pages 612-642, September.
    12. Köllő, János & Hámori, Szilvia, 2011. "Kinek használ az évvesztés?. Iskolakezdési kor és tanulói teljesítmények Magyarországon
      [Who gains by postponed schooling?. Age at starting school and achievement as pupils in Hungary]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(2), pages 133-157.
    13. Barbara Mueller & Juerg Schweri, 2012. "The returns to occupation-specific human capital - Evidence from mobility after training," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0081, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    14. Thomas Bolli & Ladina Rageth, 2016. "Measuring the Social Status of Education Programmes: Applying a New Measurement to Dual Vocational Education and Training in Switzerland," KOF Working papers 16-403, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
    15. Eichhorst, Werner & Rodríguez-Planas, Núria & Schmidl, Ricarda & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2012. "A Roadmap to Vocational Education and Training Systems Around the World," IZA Discussion Papers 7110, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    16. Kevin Pugh & Gigi Foster, 2014. "Australia's National School Data and the ‘Big Data’ Revolution in Education Economics," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 47(2), pages 258-268, June.

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