IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/auu/dpaper/419.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Effects of Unemployment on the Earnings of Young Australians

Author

Listed:
  • Matthew Gray

Abstract

The high rates of youth unemployment experienced in a number of OECD economies has raised concerns about the effect of this on subsequent earnings. Using the Australian Youth Survey (AYS) a longitudinal survey of Australian youth, we estimate the effects of unemployment on subsequent hourly and weekly earnings. The estimates suggest that, when unobserved heterogeneity is taken into account, it is only long histories of unemployment which have a negative effect on hourly wages. On the other hand, even relatively small amounts of unemployment history are associated with weekly earnings losses. The effects of unemployment on weekly earnings is shown to be mostly due to shorter working hours, with only a small part being due to lower hourly wages. These findings are consistent with the fact that Australia has binding minimum wages which limit the extent to which hourly wages can be reduced and so the impact of unemployment on earnings occurs through shorter working hours. Evidence is presented that this loss of working hours is involuntary and can therefore be counted as a cost of unemployment.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthew Gray, 2000. "The Effects of Unemployment on the Earnings of Young Australians," CEPR Discussion Papers 419, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:419
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.cbe.anu.edu.au/researchpapers/cepr/DP419.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gibbons, Robert & Katz, Lawrence F, 1991. "Layoffs and Lemons," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(4), pages 351-380, October.
    2. LaLonde, Robert J, 1986. "Evaluating the Econometric Evaluations of Training Programs with Experimental Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(4), pages 604-620, September.
    3. Olivier Jean Blanchard & Peter Diamond, 1994. "Ranking, Unemployment Duration, and Wages," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 61(3), pages 417-434.
    4. Gregory, M. & Jukes, R., 1997. "The Effects of Unemployment on Subsequent Earnings: A Study of British Men 1984-94," Papers 21, Centre for Economic Performance & Institute of Economics.
    5. Ben Lockwood, 1991. "Information Externalities in the Labour Market and the Duration of Unemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(4), pages 733-753.
    6. Vella, Francis, 1993. "Nonwage Benefits in a Simultaneous Model of Wages and Hours: Labor Supply Functions of Young Females," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(4), pages 704-723, October.
    7. Simpson, Michael & Dawkins, Peter & Madden, Gary, 1997. "Casual Employment in Australia: Incidence and Determinants," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(69), pages 194-204, December.
    8. Denise J. Doiron, 1995. "Lay-Offs as Signals: The Canadian Evidence," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 28(4a), pages 899-913, November.
    9. Ackum, Susanne, 1991. " Youth Unemployment, Labor Market Programs and Subsequent Earnings," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(4), pages 531-543.
    10. Paul W. Miller, 1995. "The Australian Longitudinal Survey and the Australian Youth Survey," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 28(1), pages 123-129.
    11. Preston, Alison, 1997. "Where Are We Now with Human Capital Theory in Australia?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 73(220), pages 51-78, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bruce Chapman & Matthew Gray, 2002. "Youth Unemployment: Aggregate Incidence and Consequences for Individuals," CEPR Discussion Papers 459, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    2. Kathrin Bertschy & M. Alejandra Cattaneo & Stefan C. Wolter, 2009. "PISA and the Transition into the Labour Market," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 23(s1), pages 111-137, March.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:419. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cpanuau.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.