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PISA Results: What a Difference Immigration Law Makes

Author

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  • Entorf, Horst

    () (Goethe University Frankfurt)

  • Minoiu, Nicoleta

    () (Darmstadt University of Technology)

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to evaluate the importance of social class, migration background and command of national languages for the PISA school performance of teenagers living in European countries (France, Finland, Germany, United Kingdom, and Sweden) and traditional countries of immigration (Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the US). Econometric results show that the influence of the socioeconomic background of parents differs strongly across nations, with the highest impact found for Germany, the UK and US, whereas social mobility is more likely in Scandinavian countries and in Canada. Moreover, for all countries our estimations imply that for students with a migration background a key for catching up is the language spoken at home. We conclude that educational policy should focus on integration of immigrant children in schools and preschools, with particular emphasis on language skills at the early stage of childhood.

Suggested Citation

  • Entorf, Horst & Minoiu, Nicoleta, 2004. "PISA Results: What a Difference Immigration Law Makes," IZA Discussion Papers 1021, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1021
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ira N. Gang & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2000. "Is Child like Parent? Educational Attainment and Ethnic Origin," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 35(3), pages 550-569.
    2. Edward L. Glaeser & Bruce I. Sacerdote & Jose A. Scheinkman, 2003. "The Social Multiplier," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(2-3), pages 345-353, 04/05.
    3. Ganzeboom, H.B.G. & de Graaf, P.M. & Treiman, D.J. & de Leeuw, J., 1992. "A standard international socio-economic index of occupational status," WORC Paper 85970031-d601-46e3-befb-1, Tilburg University, Work and Organization Research Centre.
    4. Frick, Joachim R. & Wagner, Gert G., 2001. "Economic and Social Perspectives of Immigrant Children in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 301, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Marchionni, Mariana & Vazquez, Emmanuel & Pinto, Florencia, 2012. "Desigualdad educativa en la Argentina. Análisis en base a los datos PISA 2009
      [Education Inequality in Argentina. An analysis based on PISA 2009 data]
      ," MPRA Paper 56420, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Marchionni, Mariana & Pinto, Florencia & Vazquez, Emmanuel, 2013. "Determinantes de la desigualdad en el desempe├▒o educativo en la Argentina
      [Determinants of the inequality in PISA test scores in Argentina]
      ," MPRA Paper 56421, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Arbeitsstelle Interkulturelle Konflikte und Gesellschaftliche Integration (AKI), Berlin (Ed.), 2005. "The effectiveness of bilingual school programs for immigrant children," Discussion Papers, Programme on Intercultural Conflicts and Societal Integration (AKI) SP IV 2005-601, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    PISA tests; socioeconomic status; migration; language skills; social mobility;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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